diplegia

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di·ple·gia

 (dī-plē′jə, -jē-ə)
n.
Paralysis of corresponding parts on both sides of the body.

diplegia

(daɪˈpliːdʒə)
n
(Pathology) paralysis of corresponding parts on both sides of the body; bilateral paralysis
diˈplegic adj

di•ple•gia

(daɪˈpli dʒə, -dʒi ə)

n.
paralysis of the identical part on both sides of the body.
[1880–85; di-1 + -plegia]
di•ple′gic, adj.

diplegia

a form of paralysis in which similar parts on both sides of the body are affected. — diplegic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diplegia - paralysis of corresponding parts on both sides of the body
palsy, paralysis - loss of the ability to move a body part
Translations

di·ple·gi·a

n. diplejía, parálisis bilaterial;
facial ______ facial, parálisis de ambos lados de la cara;
spastic ______ espástica.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although clinicans know that children with spastic diplegia are more likely to improve than children with spastic quadriplegia, they cannot predict which individual children will improve.
Q My three-year-old has spastic diplegia (a form of cerebral palsy involving two extremities, usually the legs) and mild developmental delays in motor and speech.
Brave Ben Baddeley, six, has spastic diplegia cerebral palsy, which tightens his leg and lower back muscles.
As a baby, six-year-old Ben was diagnosed with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy - a debilitating condition that tightens the muscles in the legs and lower back.
As a baby Ben was diagnosed with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy, a condition that tightens the muscles in the legs and lower back.
The Keep Kate Walking bid aims to bring her to the US for a life-changing procedure known as Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy which will eliminate the form of the condition she has - Spastic Diplegia Cerebral Palsy.
In a letter to Rangers fans, typed by her mum, Ivy Rose says: "I have spastic diplegia, cerebral palsy.
Oliver Armstrong, who was born very prematurely at the Royal Gwent Hospital in 2014, was diagnosed with cerebral palsy spastic diplegia when he was just 18 months old.
The images of the spastic medial gastrocnemius muscle (for patients with spastic diplegia, the most spastic gastrocnemius was assessed) were obtained with the ankle joint in the neutral position.