extinction

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ex·tinc·tion

 (ĭk-stĭngk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of extinguishing: The extinction of the fire took several hours.
b. The condition of being extinguished: mourned the extinction of her dreams.
2. The fact of being extinct or the process of becoming extinct: the extinction of the passenger pigeon; languages that are in danger of extinction.
3. Psychology A reduction or a loss in the strength or rate of a conditioned response when the unconditioned stimulus or reinforcement is withheld.
4. Physiology A gradual decrease in the excitability of a nerve to a previously adequate stimulus, usually resulting in total loss of excitability.
5. Astronomy The dimming of celestial objects, usually measured in magnitudes, due to scattering and absorption of their light as it passes through interstellar dust clouds and the earth's atmosphere.

extinction

(ɪkˈstɪŋkʃən) or

extincture

n
1. the act of making extinct or the state of being extinct
2. the act of extinguishing or the state of being extinguished
3. complete destruction; annihilation
4. (General Physics) physics reduction of the intensity of radiation as a result of absorption or scattering by matter
5. (Astronomy) astronomy the dimming of light from a celestial body as it passes through an absorbing or scattering medium, such as the earth's atmosphere or interstellar dust
6. (Psychology) psychol a process in which the frequency or intensity of a learned response is decreased as a result of reinforcement being withdrawn. Compare habituation

ex•tinc•tion

(ɪkˈstɪŋk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of extinguishing.
2. the state of being extinguished or extinct.
3. the act or process of becoming extinct: the extinction of a species.
4. the reduction or loss of a conditioned response as a result of the absence or withdrawal of reinforcement.
5. the darkness that results from rotation of a thin section to an angle (extinc′tion an`gle) at which plane-polarized light is absorbed by the polarizer.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.extinction - no longer active; extinguished; "the extinction of the volcano"
inaction, inactiveness, inactivity - the state of being inactive
2.extinction - no longer in existenceextinction - no longer in existence; "the extinction of a species"
death - the absence of life or state of being dead; "he seemed more content in death than he had ever been in life"
3.extinction - the reduction of the intensity of radiation as a consequence of absorption and radiation
absorption - (physics) the process in which incident radiated energy is retained without reflection or transmission on passing through a medium; "the absorption of photons by atoms or molecules"
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
scattering - the physical process in which particles are deflected haphazardly as a result of collisions
4.extinction - complete annihilationextinction - complete annihilation; "they think a meteor cause the extinction of the dinosaurs"
annihilation, disintegration - total destruction; "bomb tests resulted in the annihilation of the atoll"
5.extinction - a conditioning process in which the reinforcer is removed and a conditioned response becomes independent of the conditioned stimulus
conditioning - a learning process in which an organism's behavior becomes dependent on the occurrence of a stimulus in its environment
6.extinction - the act of extinguishingextinction - the act of extinguishing; causing to stop burning; "the extinction of the lights"
ending, termination, conclusion - the act of ending something; "the termination of the agreement"

extinction

noun dying out, death, destruction, abolition, oblivion, extermination, annihilation, eradication, obliteration, excision, extirpation Many species have been hunted to the point of extinction.

extinction

noun
2. The act or fact of dying:
Slang: curtain (used in plural).
Translations
إخْمادإنْقِراض
slukninguddøenudryddelse
sukupuutto
kialváskihalás
aldauîi, útrÿmingslokknun
vyhasnutie
izumrtje
sön metükenmeyok olma

extinction

[ɪksˈtɪŋkʃən] Nextinción f

extinction

[ɪkˈstɪŋkʃən] nextinction f
to face extinction → être menacé(e) d'extinction

extinction

n (of race, family, animal, species, tribe)Aussterben nt; (= annihilation)Ausrottung f; threatened with or faced with or in danger of extinctionvom Aussterben bedroht; this animal was hunted to extinctiondiese Tierart wurde durch Jagen ausgerottet

extinction

[ɪksˈtɪŋkʃn] n (of fire) → estinzione f, spegnimento; (of race) → estinzione f

extinct

(ikˈstiŋkt) adjective
1. (of a type of animal etc) no longer in existence. Mammoths became extinct in prehistoric times.
2. (of a volcano) no longer active. That volcano was thought to be extinct until it suddenly erupted ten years ago.
extinction (ikˈstiŋkʃən) noun
1. making or becoming extinct. the extinction of the species.
2. the act of putting out or extinguishing (fire, hope etc).

ex·tinc·tion

n. extinción; supresión; cesación.
References in periodicals archive ?
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In this way, LDF and other SavingSpecies donors help tackle the two most pressing environmental problems in the world today: mass species extinction and global warming.
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But is that use moral when the species extinction rate is now 1,000 times higher than the natural one?