emission spectrum

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Related to Spectral emissions: Atomic emission spectrum

emission spectrum

n.
The spectrum of bright lines, bands, or continuous radiation characteristic of and determined by a specific emitting substance subjected to a specific kind of excitation.

emission spectrum

n
(General Physics) the continuous spectrum or pattern of bright lines or bands seen when the electromagnetic radiation emitted by a substance is passed into a spectrometer. The spectrum is characteristic of the emitting substance and the type of excitation to which it is subjected. Compare absorption spectrum

e·mis·sion spectrum

The pattern of dark lines and colors made when electromagnetic energy, such as light, passes through a substance and excites its atoms. The excited atoms give off energy in the form of light. Because each type of atom gives off light having a unique range of colors, the emission spectrum can be used to determine the substance's chemical composition.
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Noun1.emission spectrum - spectrum of electromagnetic radiation emitted by a self-luminous source
spectrum - an ordered array of the components of an emission or wave
References in periodicals archive ?
Dayeh compared the experience to a fireworks display, with fluorescent spectral emissions from the combusting copper and hydrogen.
LONGER WORKING hours in front of digital displays, evenings in front of flatscreen TVs, and an almost pathological addiction to smartphones and tablets, means a change in the type of light we are exposed to and a shift in spectral emissions towards the blue and UV end of the visible spectrum.
For example, while it is impossible to directly measure temperatures in the upper atmosphere, it is possible to measure the spectral emissions from a known chemical species.
In addition to broadband emissions, the SRT can monitor spectral emissions of molecular hydrogen, making it a perfect companion for optical solar telescopes.
Given the centrality of global warming to human progress, it may be prudent to fully ascertain the Earth's emission profile, by using an array of satellites which continually monitor spectral emissions from the radio range through the infrared.
They can further be instructed to disregard an IR source whose spectral emissions or history doesn't match what it expects in a target.

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