Speech Patterns

Speech Patterns

 
  1. Accent … almost as authentic as that of the white-jacketed medico peddling hand cream to the TV millions —Harvey Swados
  2. Accent … thick as porridge —W. P. Kinsella
  3. Diction … each word distinct and unslurred, as if he were a linguistics professor moderating a panel discussion on the future of the language —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  4. The doctor’s English was perfect, pure Martha’s Vineyard; he sounded like Ted Kennedy’s insurance salesman —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  5. Dragging his words along like reluctant dogs on a string —Edith Wharton
  6. Had spoken the lines without expression, running them past, uninspired, one behind the other like passing freight cars —William Brammer
  7. He [Edmund Wilson] spoke in a curiously strangled voice, with gaps between his sentences, as if ideas jostled and thrashed about inside him, getting in one another’s way as they struggled to emerge, which made for short bursts —Isaiah Berlin, New York Times Book Review, April 12, 1987
  8. His facile elocution … which had so long charmed them, was now treated like warm gruel made to put cowards to sleep —Émile Zola
  9. His statements are often preceded by stretches of silence as painful as the space between a stutterer’s syllables, as he tries to translate his images into words —Ira Wood
  10. Inflections that rise and fall with a tidal surge equal to that of the Bay of Fundy —Richard F. Shepard about comedian Jackie Mason, New York Times
  11. Intoned monotonously like a sleep-walker —MacDonald Harris
  12. Mouthing the words and nodding to himself like an actor memorizing his lines —Donald Seaman
  13. Repeated slowly, as if he were sounding out syllables in a book —Jonathan Valin

    See Also: REPETITION

  14. The rest of it [a remark] was delivered at a clipped, furious pace, like Morse code —Jonathan Valin
  15. Said one word, carefully pursed in his mouth, spat out like a grape pip —John Fowles
  16. The sentences were spoken like sentences from a judge summing up, bit by bit —V. S. Pritchett
  17. Short brief staccato sentences like slaps —William Faulkner
  18. Spaces her adjectives like little whiplashes —John Fowles
  19. Spacing his words as if for a particularly stupid and stubborn person —Nancy Huddleston Packer
  20. Spat out the words like orange seeds —Dorothy Francis
  21. Speak falteringly, like an unrehearsed actor —Anon
  22. Speaking [in a heavy tone] … as if he were dropping words like molten lead —G. K. Chesterton
  23. Speak like a death’s head —William Shakespeare
  24. Speak … like a telegram —Dashiell Hammett
  25. Spitting the word from her mouth … as if it were a poisonous seed —Flannery O’Connor
  26. Splutter and splash like a pig in a puddle —W. S. Gilbert
  27. Spoke clearly, but in a low and hesitant voice, as if he were translating from Spanish as he went along —Norman Mailer
  28. Spoke like a radio program —Ludwig Bemelmans
  29. Spoke more slowly than ever before and with difficulty, like someone who fears a stammer —Dan Jacobson
  30. Spoke slowly, with a kind of uniformity of emphasis that made his words stand out like the raised type for the blind —Edith Wharton
  31. Spoke very slowly and deliberately, like a man reading aloud from a difficult text —Jonathan Valin
  32. Sputtered out [words] like a wet fuse —Richard Moran
  33. Stutter like a new-clipped crow —George Garrett
  34. Talked flowingly like a medium —Anaïs Nin
  35. Talked like she had bugs in her mouth —Madison Smartt Bell
  36. Talked with commas, like a heavy novel —Raymond Chandler
  37. (He had developed an unfortunate habit of) talking like a Chinese fortune cookie —John Cheever
  38. (Tendency to) talk like a Sten gun —George F. Will about Hubert Humphrey
  39. Used the English language with dictionary precision … almost as if it were a foreign tongue he had learned perfectly —Lael Tucker Wertenbaker
  40. Use her words cautiously, like weapons that might slip and inflict a wound —Edith Wharton
  41. Words … dragging out like words in an anthem —G. K. Chesterton
  42. Words, each distinct and separate, like multicolored marbles —Francis King
  43. Words leaped out of his mouth like machine-gun bullets —Frank Conroy
  44. Words were being mouthed like signal flags —Norman Mailer
References in periodicals archive ?
The new research suggests that human speech patterns, just like in songbirds, are more than just a product of learning - our brains lean toward a certain communication structure.
The findings suggest that voice-hearers have an enhanced tendency to detect meaningful speech patterns in ambiguous sounds, Health news reported.
The unique thing about the last model is that it not only learns from positive examples but also takes advantage of negative examples, so it gets smarter as it goes and performs better where similar speech patterns are repeated," Saon wrote.
First identified and studied in ancient Greece and Rome, these speech patterns are departures from simple and literal statement and include such examples as repeating words, putting words into an unexpected order, leaving out words that might have been expected, and asking questions and then answering them.
Project Abacus was first unveiled at Google I/O last year, and uses the many different sensors on a phone to track various things such as keystroke patterns, speech patterns and more, to know who is using the device.
Hidden Voice is a musicwith-film composition by John McHugh based on the speech patterns of people living with dementia and their families.
The only element striking a sour note is the way dialogue from the character Hydra caricatures ethnic minority speech patterns, creating discomfort rather than humor.
DE), India's largest private sector bank, has announced the launch of a voice recognition service that authenticates customers based on their speech patterns, allowing them to execute banking transactions through the bank's call centre.
TEHRAN (FNA)- US intelligence officials are analyzing facial features and speech patterns of the masked man who spoke in a recent ISIL video to determine if he could be an American, according to a senior US official.
Caribbean writers brought their myths, their stories, and their speech patterns and spliced them on Canada's literary canvas.
Narrated by Martha, who has the spot-on speech patterns of an insatiably adventurous tot, the book sees the bunny family hop in their camper van for a holiday by the beach.