spencer


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Related to spencer: Herbert Spencer, Diana Spencer

spen·cer 1

 (spĕn′sər)
n.
A trysail.

[Perhaps from the name Spencer.]

spen·cer 2

 (spĕn′sər)
n.
1. A short double-breasted overcoat worn by men in the early 1800s.
2. A close-fitting, waist-length jacket worn by women.

[After George John Spencer, Second Earl Spencer (1758-1834).]

spencer

(ˈspɛnsə)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a short fitted coat or jacket
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a woman's knitted vest
[C18: named after Earl Spencer (1758–1834)]

spencer

(ˈspɛnsə)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical a large loose-footed gaffsail on a square-rigger or barque
[C19: perhaps after the surname Spencer]

Spencer

(ˈspɛnsə)
n
1. (Biography) Herbert. 1820–1903, English philosopher, who applied evolutionary theory to the study of society, favouring laissez-faire doctrines
2. (Biography) Sir Stanley. 1891–1959, English painter, noted esp for his paintings of Christ in a contemporary English setting

spen•cer1

(ˈspɛn sər)

n.
any of various close-fitting, usu. waist-length jackets worn in the 18th and 19th centuries.
[1790–1800; after German. J. Spencer (1758–1834), English earl]

spen•cer2

(ˈspɛn sər)

n.
a large gaff sail used abaft a square-rigged foremast or the mainmast of a ship or bark.
[1830–40; orig. uncertain]

Spen•cer

(ˈspɛn sər)

n.
Herbert, 1820–1903, English philosopher.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spencer - English philosopher and sociologist who applied the theory of natural selection to human societies (1820-1903)Spencer - English philosopher and sociologist who applied the theory of natural selection to human societies (1820-1903)
References in classic literature ?
Cole's noteno, it cannot be more than five or at least tenfor I had got my bonnet and spencer on, just ready to come outI was only gone down to speak to Patty again about the porkJane was standing in the passagewere not you, Jane?
Slightly observant of the smoky lights; of the people, pipe in mouth, playing with limp cards and yellow dominoes; of the one bare- breasted, bare-armed, soot-begrimed workman reading a journal aloud, and of the others listening to him; of the weapons worn, or laid aside to be resumed; of the two or three customers fallen forward asleep, who in the popular high-shouldered shaggy black spencer looked, in that attitude, like slumbering bears or dogs; the two outlandish customers approached the counter, and showed what they wanted.
She is a little girl, in a spencer, with a round face and curly flaxen hair.
I've talked about theatres and music-halls, of events of the day, I've even--Heaven help me--talked of racing and football, but I might as well have talked of Herbert Spencer.
He was himself a student by disposition, with a special taste for the writings of Faraday, the forerunner; Tyndall, the expounder; and Spencer, the philosopher.
And then," continued Grandfather, "they wore various sorts of periwigs, such as the tie, the Spencer, the brigadier, the major, the Albemarle, the Ramillies, the feather-top, and the full-bottom.
Talking of Herbert Spencer," he began, "do you really find no logical difficulty in regarding Nature as a process of involution, passing from definite coherent homogeneity to indefinite incoherent heterogeneity?
Every one asks me what I 'think' of everything," said Spencer Brydon; "and I make answer as I can - begging or dodging the question, putting them off with any nonsense.
The box was full of things he had been waiting for impatiently; a new volume of Herbert Spencer, another collection of the prolific Alphonse Daudet's brilliant tales, and a novel called "Middlemarch," as to which there had lately been interesting things said in the reviews.
As he pulled a bell-handle which hung by a chain to the door-post, a very respectable old gentleman with grey hair, wearing spectacles, and dressed in a black spencer and gaiters and a broad-brimmed hat, and carrying a large gold-beaded cane, addressed him.
A man is more likely to be a good man if he has learned goodness through the love of God than through a perusal of Herbert Spencer.
But his favourite reading was Huxley, Herbert Spencer, and Henry George; while Emerson and Thomas Hardy he read for relaxation.