spina bifida

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spina bifida
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spi·na bif·i·da

 (spī′nə bĭf′ĭ-də)
n.
A congenital defect in which the spinal column is imperfectly closed so that part of the meninges or spinal cord protrudes, often resulting in hydrocephalus and other neurological disorders.

[New Latin spīna bifida : Latin spīna, spine + Latin bifida, feminine of bifidus, split in two.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

spina bifida

(ˈspaɪnə ˈbɪfɪdə)
n
(Pathology) a congenital condition in which the meninges of the spinal cord protrude through a gap in the backbone, sometimes causing enlargement of the skull (due to accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid) and paralysis
[New Latin; see spine, bifid]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

spi•na bif•i•da

(ˈspaɪ nə ˈbɪf ɪ də)
n.
a congenital defect in which part of the meninges protrudes through the spinal column, often resulting in neurological impairment.
[1710–20; < New Latin, Latin: cloven spine]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

spi·na bif·i·da

(spī′nə bĭf′ĭ-də)
A congenital defect in which the vertebral column is not fully closed, causing part of the spinal cord to bulge out. Spina bifida often results in damage to the spinal cord.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spina bifida - a not uncommon congenital defect in which a vertebra is malformedspina bifida - a not uncommon congenital defect in which a vertebra is malformed; unless several vertebrae are affected or there is myelomeningocele there are few symptoms; can be diagnosed by amniocentesis
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

spina bifida

[ˌspaɪnəˈbɪfɪdə] Nespina f bífida
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

spina bifida

[ˌspaɪnəˈbɪfɪdə] nspina-bifida m inv
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

spina bifida

noffene Wirbelsäule, Spina bifida f (spec)
adj attr babymit einer offenen Wirbelsäule
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

spina bifida

[ˌspaɪnəˈbɪfɪdə] nspina bifida
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

spi·na bi·fi·da

[MIM*182940]
n. espina bífida, malformación congénita en el cierre de un conducto de la estructura ósea de la espina vertebral, con o sin protrusión de las meninges medulares, gen. a nivel lumbar;
occult ______ oculta, sin protrusión.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

spina bifida

n espina bífida
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, of the 3 with tethered cord, only two had the cutaneous manifestation of occult spinal dysraphism. The incidence of absent Voluntary Bowel Movement (33.3%) and soiling (40%) was higher than the incidence of constipation (28.57%) in children with spinal abnormalities.
(2) Children with coccygeal skin tags often warrant concern because occult spinal dysraphism may be suspected; in addition to skin tags, sacral hemangiomas, dimples, or clusters of hair may also overlie a spinal malformation.
Pseudomeningocoeles usually form in the setting of trauma or as a complication of intentional or accidental durotomy at surgery, (1-6) while true meningocoeles occur in the setting of spinal dysraphism.
Kurzrock, "Renal cortical deterioration in children with spinal dysraphism: analysis of risk factors," The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, vol.
reported a case of a lumbar spinal ossifying lipoma in the subcutaneous region in communication with an intradural lipoma associated with spinal dysraphism [13].
The occurrence of spinal cord compression in childhood neoplasm ranges from 2.7 to 4% and is most often seen in the terminal phase of a widely metastatic cancer [5-8] Although rare cases of intraspinal and vertebrae metastasis have been reported in WT, intraspinal extension by direct contiguous spreading in a child devoid of spinal dysraphism has very infrequently been described.
There was no evidence of spinal dysraphism in this case according to the physical examination and MRI and CT images.
Nevertheless, healthcare providers should always consider the possibility that there may be a major pathology behind the BBD manifestation, such as occult spinal dysraphism or functional issues related to sexual abuse.
There are various conditions, which affect spinal cord such as degenerative myelopathy, spinal dysraphism, spina bifida, myelodysplasia, metabolic globoid cell leukodystrophy, neoplasia, immune mediated conditions, tetanus, vascular anomalies and traumatic conditions (Birchard and Sherding, 1994).
Occult spinal dysraphism and spinal cord anomalies including syrinx, low-lying conus, diastematomyelia, spinal lipoma, and tethered cord are frequent [10].
Objective: To find the frequency and types of spinal dysraphism in patients presenting with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.
Prenatal diagnosis of spinal dysraphism. Childs Nerv Syst 2013;29:1541-52.