dickcissel

(redirected from Spiza americana)
Related to Spiza americana: dickcissel, Spiza townsendi

dick·cis·sel

 (dĭk-sĭs′əl, dĭk′sĭs′-)
n.
A sparrowlike migratory bird (Spiza americana) that breeds in central North America, the male of which has a yellow breast with a black patch on the throat.

[Imitative of its song.]

dickcissel

(ˌdɪkˈsɪsəl)
n
(Animals) a small North American bird (Spiza americana), the male of which has a yellow breast, a black patch on its throat, and a mainly grey head

dick•cis•sel

(dɪkˈsɪs əl)

n.
a bunting, Spiza americana, of the E and central U.S., having a brownish back streaked with black.
[1885–90; said to be imitative of its call]
References in periodicals archive ?
Deaderick (1941:209) credited Audubon as being the first to report 50 species of birds from Arkansas, but ignored the Iowa bunting, stating that "several others cannot be placed definitely." Durant and Harwood (1980:180) speculated that Audubon was perhaps referring to dickcissels (Spiza americana) or one of the longspurs or snow buntings (Plectrophenax nivalis), but these species typically do not occur in Arkansas in winter.
Special birds of open areas were Dolichonyx oryzivorus (Bobolink) and Spiza americana (Dickcissel).
Species of concern, such as the greater prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus cupido), Henslow's sparrow (Ammodramus benslowii), dickcissel (Spiza americana), regal fritillary butterfly (Speyeria idalia), and prairie mole cricket (Gryllotalpa major) also reside on post.
Species of concern, such as the greater prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus cupido), Henslow's sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii), dickcissel (Spiza americana), regal fritillary butterfly (Speyeria idalia), and prairie mole cricket (Gryllotalpa major) also reside on post.
Dickcissels (Spiza americana) require vegetation that is moderate to tall in stature, moderate to highly dense, with low to high forb cover, low to moderate litter, and low amounts of bare ground and woody vegetation.
1993), savannah sparrows (Bedard and LaPointe 1984; Wiens 1969; Wiens 1973), dickcissels (Spiza americana) (Zimmerman 1983; Zimmerman 1984), and red-winged blackbirds (Kahl et al.
Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism of dickcissels (Spiza americana) in different habitats and at different nest densities.
Historically, the dickcissel (Spiza americana) was common throughout the Blackland Prairie Region, but there have been significant declines during the past 3 decades (Herkert, 1995; Peterjohn and Sauer, 1999; Vickery and Herkert, 2001).
Edge effects on nesting dickcissels (Spiza americana) in relation to edge type of remnant tallgrass prairie in Kansas.
The grassland-dwelling dickcissel (Spiza americana) and grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) are declining, too.
Brown-headed cowbirds, dickcissels (Spiza americana), grasshopper sparrows (Ammodramus savannarum) and meadowlarks (Sturnella spp.) were observed more frequently in pastures, and abundances were significantly greater than in CRP fields.
getula in other subspecies commonly prey on birds (Guthrie, 1932; Morrison and Bolger, 2002; Clark, 2009), only a few instances of predation by speckled kingsnakes on avian nests have been documented, e.g., dickcissels (Spiza americana; Facemire and Fretwell, 1980; Suedkamp Wells et al., 2007), red-winged blackbirds (Agelauis phonecius; Facemire and Fretwell, 1980), field sparrows (Spizella pusilla; Stake et al., 2005), and indigo buntings (Passerina cyanea; Stake et al., 2005) although other subspecies of L.