split ticket

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split ticket

n.
1. A ballot cast for candidates of two or more political parties.
2. A ticket that includes the names of candidates from more than one party.

split ticket

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) See split9 See also straight ticket

split′ tick′et


n.
a ballot on which not all votes have been cast for candidates of the same political party.
[1830–40, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.split ticket - a ballot cast by a voter who votes for candidates from more than one party
balloting, vote, voting, ballot - a choice that is made by counting the number of people in favor of each alternative; "there were only 17 votes in favor of the motion"; "they allowed just one vote per person"
straight ticket - a ballot cast by a voter who votes for all the candidates of one party
References in periodicals archive ?
Split-ticket voting has declined over the last generation.
Now it may be that the decline of split-ticket voting is another pattern this year will disrupt.
Garand and Marci Glascock Lichtl, "Explaining Divided Government in the United States: Testing an Intentional Model of Split-Ticket Voting," British Journal of Political Science 30, no.
To have a chance, he's going to have to find a lot of constituents who split their tickets between the two parties - because, as one consultant pointed out, "if he didn't have help with split-ticket voting, he'd lose by like 40 percent.
Iraqis will vote for a list of candidates rather than for individuals, with no possibility for split-ticket voting.
Split-ticket voting in states adopting the party column format was in the first few years after reform only slightly higher than under the classic strip ballot.
Policy Moderation of Conflicting Expectations: Testing the Intentional Models of Split-ticket Voting.
The extent of split-ticket voting is consistent with recent evidence of a decline in party identification amongst former Conservative supporters, coupled with more effective local campaigning by both Labour and Liberal Democrat parties.
As Alvarez and Schousen (1993, 429) put it, after finding strong empirical support for Jacobson's explanation as elaborated in his later writings, "A complete model of split-ticket voting must account for DR [Democratic for president, Republican for representative] ballots as well as RD ballots.
Policy Moderation or Conflicting Expectations: Testing the Intentional Models of Split-Ticket Voting.
Strong party identification by voters has decreased and split-ticket voting has increased over a long period of time.
The 1990s have witnessed a flurry of research on split-ticket voting and divided government in the United States (Alesina and Rosenthal 1995; Alvarez and Schousen 1993; Beck et al.