incontinence

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in·con·ti·nence

 (ĭn-kŏn′tə-nəns)
n.
The quality or state of being incontinent.

incontinence

Condition resulting from various causes, including injury or old age, in which urination cannot be voluntarily controlled. It may be temporary or permanent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incontinence - involuntary urination or defecation
excreting, excretion, voiding, elimination, evacuation - the bodily process of discharging waste matter
enuresis, urinary incontinence - inability to control the flow of urine and involuntary urination
2.incontinence - indiscipline with regard to sensuous pleasures
indiscipline, undiscipline - the trait of lacking discipline
rakishness - the quality of a rake

incontinence

noun
A complete surrender of inhibitions:
Translations
inkontinens
karkailu
incontinentie

incontinence

[ɪnˈkɒntɪnəns] Nincontinencia f

incontinence

[ɪnˈkɒntɪnəns] nincontinence f

incontinence

n (Med) → Inkontinenz f; (of desires)Zügellosigkeit f, → Hemmungslosigkeit f

incontinence

:
incontinence pad
nEinlage ffür Inkontinente
incontinence sheet
nUnterlage ffür Inkontinente

incontinence

[ɪnˈkɒntɪnəns] n (Med) → incontinenza

in·con·ti·nence

n. incontinencia, emisión involuntaria, inhabilidad de controlar la orina o las heces fecales;
bowel ______ intestinal;
fecal ______ fecal;
overflow ______ por rebozamiento;
reflex ______ de reflejo;
urinary ______ urinaria;
urinary stress ______ urinaria de esfuerzo.

incontinence

n incontinencia; fecal — incontinencia fecal, incapacidad f para retener las heces; overflow — incontinencia por rebosamiento; stress — incontinencia de esfuerzo; urge — incontinencia de urgencia; urinary — incontinencia urinaria, incapacidad f para retener la orina
References in periodicals archive ?
Overt PPUR is defined as the failure in spontaneous voiding within six hours of vaginal birth, whereas covert PPUR refers to a bladder volume of [greater than or equal to]150 mL remaining after spontaneous urination (3).
Patient characteristics Number of patients 57 Gender, n Male 34 Female 23 Age, median (range) 50 years (20-75) Neurologic disorder, n (%) Spinal cord injury 36 (63.2) Paraplegia 21 (36.8) Tetraplegia 15 (26.3) Multiple sclerosis 9 (15.8) Myelitis 3 (5.3) Familial spastic paraplegia 2 (3.5) Spina bifida 2 (3.5) Miller Fisher syndrome 1 (18) Cerebral palsy 1 (18) Huntington's disease 1 (18) Epidural abscess 1 (18) Sacral agenesis 1 (18) Bladder emptying, n (%) Indwelling catheter 13 (22.8) Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) 40 (70.2) Spontaneous voiding 2 (3.5) Combination of CIC and spontaneous voiding 2 (3.5) Please Note: Illustration(s) are not available due to copyright restrictions.
A nonblinded, single-center RCT conducted in Australia compared 2 methods for obtaining a clean-catch urine sample within 5 minutes: the Quick-Wee method (suprapubic stimulation with gauze soaked in cold fluid) or usual care (waiting for spontaneous voiding with no stimulation).
Composite scores were computed using the following coding scheme: myelomeningocele type (1 = no, 2 = yes), shunt status (1 = no, 2 = yes), ambulation status (1 = no assistance/ankle-foot orthoses, 2 = knee-ankle-foot orthoses/hip-knee-ankle-foot orthoses, 3 = wheelchair assistance), voiding status (1 = spontaneous voiding, 2 = CIC/wearing a pad), and defecation status (1 = spontaneous defecation, 2 = enema/ laxatives/wearing a pad/antegrade continent enema).

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