superspy

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superspy

(ˈsuːpəˌspaɪ)
n, pl -spies
a highly accomplished spy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Other topics include French spy fiction of the Cold War, Cold War cinema in the US and Germany, Cold War interpretations in post-Soviet Russia, and remembering the American war in Vietnam.
Russian spy fiction is fun, no doubt, but not an acceptable distraction from the facts of our present crisis.
"The Middleman is smart and entertaining and consistently intriguing, clipping along in brief chapters, somewhat reminiscent of the novels of James Patterson, and often animated by lovely, spare descriptive writing....Yet because the premise of The Middleman is so audacious and because its point of view is fragmented, the novel doesn't fully exhibit the propulsive force of some of Steinhauer's spy fiction." SCOTT TUROW
I've always loved Cold War spy fiction, and enjoy reading primary sources, so I expected that the District of Columbia indictment against a dozen Russians charged with interfering in the 2016 United States presidential election would be a satisfying read.<br />I was also curious to see how the government's legal team would handle familiar writing challenges.
Spy fiction author Charles Cumming was rejected for MI6 at a job interview after being caught in a honey trap.
'A friend of mine insisted I write spy fiction and thus I created my first novel Makazonga in 1960,' Kaleem once said.
The fall of the Berlin Wall 30 years ago left a John le Carre-sized void in the world of spy fiction that would eventually be filled by D.C.
Yet spy fiction is not the same as detective fiction.
Conaway, the Republican in charge of the investigation, told reporters that the Committee was able to find only "some bad judgment, inappropriate meetings", suggesting that those who believed in the allegations had read too much spy fiction written by Tom Clancy or Vince Flynn.
Greene eventually abandoned this distinction, realizing perhaps that his best books troubled easy categorization, but a similar dichotomy has stigmatized modern spy fiction since its inception at the turn of the twentieth century, and the genre has been relegated to (at best) the ranks of the middlebrow and largely excluded from academic discourse.
Lassner has taught courses on Holocaust literature and film at Northwestern University and penned several books, including "Anglo-Jewish Women Writing the Holocaust" and "Espionage and Exile: Fascism and Anti-Fascism in British Spy Fiction and Film."
Fans of historical fiction, spy fiction and thrilling drama will love every moment of The Alice Network.