Squamata

(redirected from Squamates)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Squamates: order Squamata
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Squamata - diapsid reptiles: snakes and lizards
animal order - the order of animals
Lepidosauria, subclass Lepidosauria - diapsid reptiles: lizards; snakes; tuataras
Lacertilia, Sauria, suborder Lacertilia, suborder Sauria - true lizards; including chameleons and geckos
References in periodicals archive ?
The epidermis of squamates is composed of a series of discrete layers, the outermost of which is one cell layer thick and rich in beta keratin (Irish et ah, 1988; Maderson et ah, 1998).
Pyron had previously analyzed an evolutionary tree containing all groups of squamates, the group that comprises lizards and snakes.
It is widely assumed that there is a functional relationship in squamates between flicking of the tongue and delivery of chemical cues to the vomeronasal system (VNS; see Young, 1993), Electrophysiological data have demonstrated a close temporal correlation between the activity pattern of the tongue retractor system and stimulation of the sensory receptors in the vomeronasal organs (VNO; Meredith & Burghardt, 1978).
The evolution of helodermatid squamates, with descriptions of a new taxon and an overview of the Varanoidea.
In squamates, researchers have demonstrated a positive correlation between adult body size and age at maturation (e.
Typical n ode-based definitions, then, might read as follows: "Lepidosauria is the most recent common ancestor of Sphenodon and squamates and all of its descendants" or "Mammalia is the most recent common ancestor of montremes and therians and all of their descendants.
It is widely assumed that there is a functional relationship in squamates between extrusion of the tongue (tongue flick behavior) and delivery of chemical cues to the vomeronasal system (VNS).
Squamates are one of the groups of reptiles with the greatest variation in life histories.
Griggs Assistant Professor of Biology in GW's Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, along with researchers from the City University of New York and Arizona State University, detail the cataloguing of 4,161 species of snakes and lizards, or squamates.
Note that the living anurans (frogs and toads), birds, and turtles are not listed below, and only the orders of living (Mod, modern) salamanders, squamates, and mammals that are also recovered in the cave are listed.