sima

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si·ma

 (sī′mə)
n.
The lower layer of the earth's outer crust that underlies the sial and is rich in silica, iron, and magnesium.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sima

(ˈsaɪmə)
n
1. (Geological Science) the silicon-rich and magnesium-rich rocks of the earth's oceanic crust, the most abundant individual rock being basalt
2. (Geological Science) the earth's continental lower crust, probably comprised of gabbro rather than basalt
[C20: from si(lica) + ma(gnesia)]
simatic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sima - rock that form the continuous lower layer of the earth's crustsima - rock that form the continuous lower layer of the earth's crust; rich in silicon and magnesium
crust, Earth's crust - the outer layer of the Earth
rock, stone - material consisting of the aggregate of minerals like those making up the Earth's crust; "that mountain is solid rock"; "stone is abundant in New England and there are many quarries"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sima

[ˈsaɪmə] n (Geol) → sima m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Another article continuing in this vein is the important study on "Chinese Historical Criticism: Liu Chih-chi and Ssu-ma Kuang" (from the now classic symposium volume.
From the Historical Records of Ssu-ma Chien (145--86 BC)
There are passages of this kind in the Analects of Confucius and the work of China's first great historian, Ssu-ma Ch'ien (c.
Bol, "Government, Society, and State: On the Political Visions of Ssu-ma Kuang and Wang An-shih," in Robert Hymes and Conrad Schirokauer, eds., Ordering the World: Approaches to State and Society in Sung Dynasty China, (Berkeley, 1993), pp.
Strangely enough, part of the reappraisal resulted from the efforts of the man who is undeniably China's greatest historian, Ssu-ma Ch'ien, who lived from around 145 to 89 B.C., during the Han dynasty.
220) astrologer and historiographer, Ssu-ma Ch'ien (d.
Born sometime before 230 as Ssu-ma Yen, a scion of an illustrious family in northern China; as a young man he entered the army of the kingdom of Wei (in Huang River valley), one of the Three Kingdoms which had arisen on the ruins of the later Han Empire; his great uncle had achieved considerable renown as a general, fighting for the Wei in Szechwan (Sichuan) against the Shu-Han and subduing Kung-sun's Liaotung (Liaodong) kingdom; he followed in his uncle's footsteps and led several campaigns against the Shu-Han, culminating in his conquest of Shu-Han for Wei (c.
The first four articles--"Ssu-ma Hsiang-ju's 'Tall Gate Palace Rhapsody,'" "The Emperor and Literature: Emperor Wu of the Han," "The fu in the Xijing zaji," "The Poetry of an Imperial Concubine: The Favorite Beauty Ban"--discuss different aspects of "Court Literature of the Former Han." The next three items concentrate on a single author, viz., "Yang Xiong, a Court Poet of the Late Western Han." Yang Xiong, a difficult and multi-faceted writer with a complicated personality, was the subject of Knechtges's 1968 doctoral thesis at the University of Washington.
Press, 1974), 24-33; see also Burton Watson, Ssu-ma Ch'ien, Grand Historian of China (New York: Columbia Univ.
According to Ssu-ma Chen [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (fl.
Chapter 24 of the Ssu-ma Ch'ien's [CHINESE TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (c.