Ssu-ma Ch'ien


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Ssu-ma Ch'ien

(ˈsuːmɑː ˈtʃɪən)
n
(Biography) a variant transliteration of Si-ma Qian
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Press, 1974), 24-33; see also Burton Watson, Ssu-ma Ch'ien, Grand Historian of China (New York: Columbia Univ.
There are passages of this kind in the Analects of Confucius and the work of China's first great historian, Ssu-ma Ch'ien (c.
Strangely enough, part of the reappraisal resulted from the efforts of the man who is undeniably China's greatest historian, Ssu-ma Ch'ien, who lived from around 145 to 89 B.C., during the Han dynasty.
To give substance to this judgment, Ssu-ma Ch'ien took all known accounts written over the intervening three centuries that purported to describe Confucius, following the principle that if there was no clear reason for discarding an item of biographical information, then he should include it, leaving for later generations the task of winnowing the true from the false.
220) astrologer and historiographer, Ssu-ma Ch'ien (d.
However, it is very strange that Ssu-ma Ch'ien should have written two separate biographies of "Ch'un-y[ddot{u}] K'un," as though there were two contemporary personages of the same appellation: Shih-chi 1267.3197-99 and 74.2347.
Chapter 24 of the Ssu-ma Ch'ien's [CHINESE TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (c.
According to Ssu-ma Ch'ien's biography in the Hanshu [CHINESE TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], ten of the 130 Shih-chi chapters were missing by the second half of the first century A.D., having only a title listing but no text (yu lu wu shu [CHINESE TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).(3) One of these ten chapters, as they are noted by the Han-shu commentator Chang Yen [CHINESE TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (third century), is the "Book on Music."(4) The Shih-chi commentator Ssu-ma Chen [CHINESE TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (eighth century), after quoting Chang Yen, holds that the "Book on Music" was based on the "Records of Music" ("Yueh-chi" [CHINESE TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) chapter of the Li-chi [CHINESE TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].(5)
Ssu-ma Ch'ien [Chinese Text Omitted] repeats the first part of the narrative - the boating story and Ts'ai Chi's marriage - and then records that Ch'i and its allies invaded Ts'ai and then attacked Ch'u.
In an essay here by Stephen Durrant, the principal historical source for the study of the First Emperor, Ssu-ma Ch'ien's (145-85?
For this also sees, and collected biographies.(1) This new, fragmented arrangement of historical data allowed Ssu-ma Ch'ien to approach events from diverse angles, and indeed he sometimes narrates a single incident more than once, in different chapters, from slightly different points of view.
The Ch'ing scholar Chao I (1727-1814) noted that officials whose achievements or mistakes did not merit separate biographies could be treated in the tables, and he further observed that the information in the tables allowed the biographies to avoid lengthy explanations that would unduly complicate the narrative.(4) More recently, Hsu Fu-kuan has proposed that Ssu-ma Ch'ien used the tables to highlight key events.(5) This last suggestion contradicts the preceding point, which held that the tables communicate nonessential information, and raises a crucial question: are the tables merely indexes and supplements, or do they embody interpretive insights?