St. John's wort


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St. John's wort

n (bot) hipérico, hierba de San Juan
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the variable effects of St. John's wort on different conventional drugs, and the mechanism by which these effects may operate, remain largely inconclusive.
St. John's Wort has been used traditionally for its medicinal properties as it promotes healthy emotional balance, wound healing, muscle pain and, positive mood.
These researchers did such a review study on St. John's wort and published their results in the Journal of Affective Disorders.
The herb St. John's wort has a 2,000-year tradition of use for depression, pain, and insomnia.
An RCT using population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling approach revealed that coadministration of St. John's wort at recommended daily doses (data not shown) for 7 days significantly increased apparent clearance of S-warfarin but had no direct effect on warfarin pharmacodynamics in healthy subjects [13].
Notable industry experts have co-authored a study that identified adulterated St. John's wort products and recommended specific ways to improve testing of the popular herb.
* St. John's wort. He described this as "probably the most popular herbal remedy for depression," with about 40 published trials to date: 26 placebo controlled, and 14 with standard antidepressant comparators.
St. John's wort, used to combat depression, is often taken with many commonly prescribed medications that can form a dangerous combination, recent data suggest.
There's a good chance that the black cohosh, Echinacea, ginkgo, St. John's wort, and other botanical supplements in your medicine cabinet may not be what the labels say they are.
This literature review aims to critique the scientific literature by Rapaport et al (2011) entitled The treatment of minor depression with St. John's Wort or citalopram: failure to show benefit over placebo.
The Center for Science in the Public Interest recently issued a warning about the commonly taken supplement St. John's wort. This supplement is often touted as a treatment for depression.
St. John's wort products and extracts have been used for a wide range of medical conditions, the most common being depressive disorders.