stagecoach

(redirected from Stagecoaches)
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stage·coach

 (stāj′kōch′)
n.
A four-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle formerly used to transport mail and passengers over a regular route.

stagecoach

(ˈsteɪdʒˌkəʊtʃ)
n
(Automotive Engineering) a large four-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle formerly used to carry passengers, mail, etc, on a regular route between towns and cities

stage•coach

(ˈsteɪdʒˌkoʊtʃ)

n.
a horse-drawn coach that formerly traveled over a fixed route with passengers, parcels, etc.
[1630–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stagecoach - a large coach-and-four formerly used to carry passengers and mail on regular routes between towns; "we went out of town together by stage about ten or twelve miles"
coach-and-four, four-in-hand, coach - a carriage pulled by four horses with one driver
Translations
عَرَبَة البَريد
dostavník
diligence
postakocsi
dostavník

stagecoach

[ˈsteɪdʒkəʊtʃ] Ndiligencia f

stagecoach

stage-coach [ˈsteɪdʒkəʊtʃ] ndiligence fstage direction nindication f scéniquestage door nentrée f des artistesstage fright ntrac m

stagecoach

[ˈsteɪdʒˌkəʊtʃ] ndiligenza

stage2

(steidʒ) noun
1. a period or step in the development of something. The plan is in its early stages; At this stage, we don't know how many survivors there are.
2. part of a journey. The first stage of our journey will be the flight to Singapore.
3. a section of a bus route.
4. a section of a rocket.
ˈstagecoach noun
a closed vehicle pulled by horses that travelled in former times along a regular route and carried passengers and mail.
References in classic literature ?
While incidents like these, arising out of drums and masquerades and parties at quadrille, were passing at the west end of the town, heavy stagecoaches and scarce heavier waggons were lumbering slowly towards the city, the coachmen, guard, and passengers, armed to the teeth, and the coach--a day or so perhaps behind its time, but that was nothing--despoiled by highwaymen; who made no scruple to attack, alone and single-handed, a whole caravan of goods and men, and sometimes shot a passenger or two, and were sometimes shot themselves, as the case might be.
This I did because I knew the Dutch gentlemen and their servants would be upon the road that day, either in the stagecoaches or riding post, and I did not know but the drunken fellow, or somebody else that might have seen me at Harwich, might see me again, and so I thought that in one day's stop they would be all gone by.
The road was built by the civil engineer Thomas Telford for Irish MPs to travel on stagecoaches from Holyhead to London.
Sells presents a well crafted, meticulously researched and deftly written treatise on the importance and impact of stagecoaches with respect to the westward expansion in the United States.