stalagmite

(redirected from Stalagmites)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

sta·lag·mite

 (stə-lăg′mīt′, stăl′əg-)
n.
A conical mineral deposit, usually calcite or aragonite, built up on the floor of a cavern, formed from the dripping of mineral-rich water.

[New Latin stalagmītēs, a drop, from Greek stalagma, a drop, or stalagmos, dropping, both from stalassein, stalak-, to drip.]

stal′ag·mit′ic (stăl′əg-mĭt′ĭk, stə-lăg′-) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stalagmite

(ˈstæləɡˌmaɪt)
n
(Geological Science) a cylindrical mass of calcium carbonate projecting upwards from the floor of a limestone cave: formed by precipitation from continually dripping water. Compare stalactite
[C17: from New Latin stalagmites, from Greek stalagmos dripping; related to Greek stalassein to drip; compare stalactite]
stalagmitic, ˌstalagˈmitical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sta•lag•mite

(stəˈlæg maɪt, ˈstæl əgˌmaɪt)

n.
a deposit, usu. of calcium carbonate, resembling an inverted stalactite, formed on the floor of a cave or the like by the dripping of percolating calcareous water.
[1675–85; < New Latin stalagmites < Greek stálagm(a) a drop (stalag-, s. of stalássein to drip + -ma n. suffix of result) + New Latin -ites -ite1]
stal`ag•mit′ic (-ˈmɪt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

sta·lag·mite

(stə-lăg′mīt′)
A cylindrical or conical mineral deposit, similar to a stalactite, but built up from the floor of a cave or cavern.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stalagmite

A calcium carbonate column on a cave floor formed in the same way as a stalactite.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stalagmite - a cylinder of calcium carbonate projecting upward from the floor of a limestone cave
cave - a geological formation consisting of an underground enclosure with access from the surface of the ground or from the sea
cylinder - a surface generated by rotating a parallel line around a fixed line
dripstone - the form of calcium carbonate found in stalactites and stalagmites
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
stalagmit
stalagmit
StalagmitTropfstein
álló cseppkõ
dropasteinskerti
stalagmitas
stalagmīts
stalagmit
dikit

stalagmite

[ˈstæləgmaɪt] Nestalagmita f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stalagmite

[ˈstæləgmaɪt] nstalagmite f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

stalagmite

nStalagmit m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

stalagmite

[ˈstæləgˌmaɪt] nstalagmite f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

stalagmite

(ˈstӕləgmait) , ((American) stəˈlӕgmait) noun
a spike of limestone rising from the floor of a cave, formed by water dripping from the roof.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
This shortly brought them to a be- witching spring, whose basin was incrusted with a frostwork of glittering crystals; it was in the midst of a cavern whose walls were supported by many fan- tastic pillars which had been formed by the joining of great stalactites and stalagmites together, the result of the ceaseless water-drip of centuries.
Sometimes the stalagmites took strange forms, presumably where the dropping of the water had not always been on the same spot.
A research team at National Taiwan University (NTU) has reconstructed 2,700 years of rainfall in Southeast Asia by analyzing stalagmites from caves in southern Thailand, UDN reports.
Judy Scala, a retired English teacher, wrote: "The way to remember the difference between stalactites and stalagmites is in their spellings.
The cave is famous for its charming beauty as the stalactites and stalagmites have created unique natural shapes.
And inside, there are huge stalactites and stalagmites and scientists who are doing the monsoon studies are very much interested," said Dr Tapan Pal, director PSS, GSI, NER.
Earth scientists at Vanderbilt University at Tennessee in the US found that stalagmites from the Mawmluh Cave, Meghalaya, and the surrounding region indicate the recurrence of intense, multi-year droughts in India over the last several thousand years.
The last one depicts streams of light from the surface around stalagmites on the floor of Loong Con Cave, which cavers call 'Cactus Garden'.
When inside it is nothing short of spectacular - hundreds and thousands of delicate stalactites hanging down from the ceiling, while on the cave floor stand the biggest stalagmites that Millard has ever seen.
Locals also refer the cave as an imperial palace with the presence of 4 pillar-like structures at the central part of the cave created by the merging of centuries-old stalactites and stalagmites.
It features cathedral-like caverns, stalactites and stalagmites.