socialist realism

(redirected from Stalinist Art)
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socialist realism

n.
A Marxist aesthetic doctrine that seeks to promote the development of socialism through didactic use of literature, art, and music.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

socialist realism

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Communist countries, esp formerly) the doctrine that art, literature, etc should present an idealized portrayal of reality, which glorifies the achievements of the Communist Party
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

so′cialist re′alism


n.
a state-approved style in art or literature that celebrates the worker's life in a socialist country.
[1930–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

socialist realism

a Marxist-inspired artistic and literary theory or doctrine that calls on art and literature to promote the socialist cause and sees the artist, writer, etc. as a servant of the state or, in the words of Stalin, “the engineer of human souls.”
See also: Art, Communism
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

socialist realism

n (Art, Liter) → sozialistischer Realismus
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
There's Stalinist art, busts of Soviet leaders, a burst of colors and glittering chandeliers; there's classical music, too and grand marble walls - all so enthralling that the moment lingers inside you like barbiturates seeping through your veins.
He considers the Russian avant-garde, Stalinist art as "the earthly incarnation of the demiurge," the invention of socialist-realism by the State, and the utopian artist as "little guy." This book is rich in description of theater, sculpture, music, graphic design and other kinds of art, but lacks any pictures or even an index.
Perhaps most interesting of all is Iankovskaia's examination of the differing methods of defining the artistic identities that existed within the Stalinist art establishment.
Fully achieved Stalinist art, observes Katerina Clark, was an "ideological ecosystem" that eradicated conflict, brightening reality and ridding it of "pollutants."|8~ If so, the years between 1946 and 1953 saw the acme of Socialist Realism, as earlier representations of struggle were superseded by blandly harmonious depictions of everyday life in an achieved utopia.
Yet Stalinist art has long deserved examination, not only because of its political context and motivation, and not just for what it tells about the Stalinist period overall, but also because of its esthetics, which have been and continue to be surprisingly appealing to ordinary viewers of art, both within what used to be the Soviet Union as well as abroad.