standing wave

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standing wave

n.
A wave that oscillates in place and creates stable nodes of maximum and zero oscillation, produced whenever a wave is confined within boundaries, as in the vibrating string of a musical instrument. Also called stationary wave.

standing wave

n
(General Physics) physics the periodic disturbance in a medium resulting from the combination of two waves of equal frequency and intensity travelling in opposite directions. There are generally two kinds of displacement, and the maximum value of the amplitude of one of these occurs at the same points as the minimum value of the amplitude of the other. Thus in the case of electromagnetic radiation the amplitude of the oscillations of the electric field has its greatest value at the points at which the magnetic oscillation is zero, and vice versa. Also called: stationary wave Compare node, antinode

stand′ing wave′


n.
Physics.
a wave in which each point on the wave has a constant amplitude, ranging from zero at the nodes to a maximum, equal to the amplitude of the wave, at the antinodes.

stand·ing wave

(stăn′dĭng)
A wave that does not appear to move. Standing waves occur when two similar waves travel in opposite directions between two fixed points, called nodes, at which there is no movement. Standing waves can be transverse waves, like ocean waves, or longitudinal waves, like sound waves. Also called stationary wave.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.standing wave - a wave (as a sound wave in a chamber or an electromagnetic wave in a transmission line) in which the ratio of its instantaneous amplitude at one point to that at any other point does not vary with time
undulation, wave - (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
Translations
stående våg
References in periodicals archive ?
Once fundamental modes-as-styles get out there and start bouncing around in the media space, they combine, cancel and reinforce to create clear patterns in standing waves of style.
Reflected power creates standing waves, hence the ratio being used as a measure.
Performing on Sunday are Laura Marling, Kate Rusby, Roddy Woomble, The Furrow Collective, Lankum (Lynched), Mike Heron and the Trembling Bells, Alasdair Roberts, The Destroyers, Trembling Bells, Kaia Kater, Marry Waterson and David A Jaycock, Nifeco Costa & Babcock Jazz, The Standing Waves, Fenne Lily, Jess Morgan and Culture Dub Orchestra.
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For Taonga Tu Puoro: Standing Waves in Space, the frequency to be used in the room was found using a tone generator.
Boise a vibrant surf community includes a surf shop and surfboard shapers, some 500 miles from any ocean, and the reason is twofold: the Boise River flows all year long, and the innovative park features two patented Wave Shapers, which can be adjusted in real time to create standing waves all year round at any river flow, and for surfers of all skill levels.
Patent Office that covers the development of a speaker enclosure that solves the issue of redirecting destructive standing waves, and provides true to source listening.
They constructed it as the superposition of two standing waves, one bounded and the other one singular at the origin.
The CD-ROM contains five videos of liquefaction under standing waves and progressive waves and the flotation of a buried pipeline under progressive waves.
Standing waves are formed in the tube when the sound waves propagated in it are reflected at both the open and closed ends.
The topics include the basic theory of the molecule-metal interface, scanning tunneling microscope studies of the interfaces, X-ray standing waves and surfaces X-ray scattering studies of molecule-metal interfaces, the fundamental structure of organic solids and their interfaces by photoemission spectroscopy and related methods, and vibrational spectroscopies for future studies of the molecule-metal interface.