Stanley Falls


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Stanley Falls

pl n
(Placename) the former name of Boyoma Falls

Bo•yo′ma Falls′

(bɔˈyoʊ mə)
n.pl.
seven cataracts of the Lualaba River where it becomes the Zaire (Congo) River, in the NE Democratic Republic of the Congo, S of Kisangani.
Formerly, Stanley Falls.
References in periodicals archive ?
But Stanley falls for Sophie and struggles to find a rational explanation for her boggling feats of clairvoyance.
And then you're just playing it by ear, all the way to Stanley Falls."
The same article claims that "the Bakuma tribe in the neighbourhood of Stanley Falls have for some time past given themselves up to cannibalism, cases of which are a daily occurrence, the victims being supplied by murders and raids on neighbouring tribes." Captured Europeans were reportedly eaten as well, as in the case of a M.
(3) These journals, published posthumously in the American Century Magazine in 1897, contained in their pages one particularly incendiary report: how in 1895 the Belgian Captain Leon Rom had "ornamented his flower-beds" around the Stanley Falls station "with the heads of twenty-one natives killed in a punitive expedition" (Glave 706, Hochschild 144-7, Firchow 128-32).
The subdued thundering mutter of the Stanley Falls hung in the heavy night air of the last navigable reach of the Upper Congo.
The time-span in the essay is significant, because in A Personal Record Conrad assigns his boyhood's vow (taken alone, in that account) to 1868, saying it was 'after a quarter of a century or so' that he reached the spot where, in the passage above, he places the final realization: of course, that was Stanley Falls. There his own recent experience forced him to confront actuality, the personage soon to be revealed to the world.
Tippu Tib, though Arab rather than European, occupied Kurtz's supposed position as chief of the Stanley Falls station (SRC, 7, 293), and his wandering followers |looting and destroying every village they come across' recall Kurtz's marauders (SRC, 108).
Nowhere in any of his writings did Conrad report that Marlow's venture into the heart of darkness followed his own voyage from Stanley Pool to Stanley Falls. Nowhere in "Heart of Darkness" does it say that Marlow voyages up the Congo to find Kurtz.
To that end he affirms that in "Heart of Darkness" directly reflects what Conrad witnessed on his voyage to Stanley Falls (Congo 61).
The steamer covered the thousand miles from Kinchasa to Stanley Falls in little less than one month" on "a routine business trip" (49).
Aware that little of Conrad's voyage to Stanley Falls could have served as inspiration for Marlow's voyage, why then haven't critics thought to look elsewhere?