Star Chamber


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Star Chamber

n.
1. A 15th-century to 17th-century English court consisting of judges who were appointed by the Crown and sat in closed session on cases involving state security.
2. star chamber A court or group that engages in secret, harsh, or arbitrary procedures.

[So called because the ceiling of the original courtroom was decorated with stars.]

Star Chamber

n
1. (Historical Terms) English history the Privy Council sitting as a court of equity, esp powerful under the Tudor monarchs; abolished 1641
2. (Law) (sometimes not capitals) any arbitrary tribunal dispensing summary justice
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (sometimes not capitals) (in Britain, in a Conservative government) a group of senior ministers who make the final decision on the public spending of each government department

Star′ Cham`ber


n.
1. an English law court, abolished in 1641, that included members of the monarch's privy council and considered cases without a jury or other procedures of common-law courts.
2. (l.c.) any tribunal, committee, or the like, that acts in an arbitrary or unfair manner.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Star Chamber - a former English court that became notorious for its arbitrary methods and severe punishments
court, judicature, tribunal - an assembly (including one or more judges) to conduct judicial business
References in periodicals archive ?
| Theresa May has legal difficulties Attorney General Geoffrey Cox, the European Research Group's "Star Chamber" of lawyers and the People's Vote QCs all dealt blows to the Prime Minister's deal, concluding there was no right for the UK to unilaterally end the backstop arrangement.
Re-creating a convoluted disaster like this diplomatic attack and the subsequent "Star Chamber" inquiries, with its paralysis of guilt and suspicion, is no easy feat.
One word of caution: If you are thinking of using steel bore brushes, they are great for cleaning the locking lugs and star chamber areas, but you don't want to use them in your guns' bores because steel bristles can scratch a chrome-lined barrel.
"The bigger concern for me is the secretive way this has been handled by Denbighshire council, it is like the Star Chamber in Tudor times, decisions made behind closed doors."
Guy Fawkes is even said to have come to Ordsall Hall to hatch his infamous gunpowder plot in the Star Chamber.
Ackroyd begins with close attention to one of the few extant extra-dramatic documents pertaining to the child players: the 'Clifton vs Robinson' Star Chamber case ca 1600.
This resulted in the mayor, when he retired from his office, being taken to the Star Chamber in London to answer allegations against him, but with the support of the council he was freed.
Now, however, anyone can simply complain to this new Star Chamber if their safe zones are offended in any way, and any lawyer who has an opinion different than the party line of the politically correct can be deemed mentally unfit to continue to practice law.
The bolt recesses are easy to clean with the Star Chamber Tool.
The ceiling of the Star Chamber in the Palace of Westminster was brought to the castle in 1836, along with panelling and four tapestries.
FULHAM defender Sascha Riether was in the dock over a 'bad' stamp after being the first player judged by the Prem's 'star chamber' of former referees.