starflower

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star·flow·er

 (stär′flou′ər)
n.
1. Any of several small plants of the genus Trientalis, especially the North American species T. borealis, having white starlike flowers.
2. Any of several plants having starlike flowers.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

starflower

(ˈstɑːˌflaʊə)
n
(Plants) any of several plants with starlike flowers, esp the star-of-Bethlehem
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

star•flow•er

(ˈstɑrˌflaʊ ər)

n.
any of several plants having starlike flowers, as the star-of-Bethlehem or any plant belonging to the genus Trientalis of the primrose family.
[1620–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.starflower - common Old World herb having grasslike leaves and clusters of star-shaped white flowers with green stripesstarflower - common Old World herb having grasslike leaves and clusters of star-shaped white flowers with green stripes; naturalized in the eastern United States
star-of-Bethlehem - any of several perennial plants of the genus Ornithogalum native to the Mediterranean and having star-shaped flowers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
You must not speak or laugh for six years, and must make in that time six shirts for us out of star-flowers. If a single word comes out of your mouth, all your labour is vain.' And when the brothers had said this the quarter of an hour came to an end, and they flew away out of the window as swans.
The next morning she went out, collected star-flowers, and began to sew.
The wood I walk in on this mild May day, with the young yellow-brown foliage of the oaks between me and the blue sky, the white star-flowers and the blue-eyed speedwell and the ground ivy at my feet, what grove of tropic palms, what strange ferns or splendid broad-petalled blossoms, could ever thrill such deep and delicate fibres within me as this home scene?