Stark effect

(redirected from Stark effects)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Stark effect

(German ʃtark)
n
(General Physics) the splitting of the lines of a spectrum when the source of light is subjected to a strong electrostatic field, discovered by Johannes Stark (1874–1957) in 1913
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In recent years the stark effects of climate change have risen up the agenda both domestically and internationally, with flooding and moorland fires in Greater Manchester linked by experts to global warming and the more extreme weather events associated with it.
In a Wednesday (http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/healthcare/313672-keep-obamacare-to-keep-progress-on-treating-opioid-disorders) report  in The Hill, two researchers from Harvard Medical School and New York University said repealing the ACA and its behavioral health provisions would have "stark effects" on people suffering from behavioral illnesses and drug addiction.
Meanwhile, it is found that the charges are redistributed and the phenomenon of giant Stark effects appears, which is similar to ZnO nanoribbons [22, 40].