state of affairs

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Noun1.state of affairs - the general state of thingsstate of affairs - the general state of things; the combination of circumstances at a given time; "the present international situation is dangerous"; "wondered how such a state of affairs had come about"; "eternal truths will be neither true nor eternal unless they have fresh meaning for every new social situation"- Franklin D.Roosevelt
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
absurd, the absurd - a situation in which life seems irrational and meaningless; "The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth"--Albert Camus
acceptance - the state of being acceptable and accepted; "torn jeans received no acceptance at the country club"
ballgame, new ballgame - a particular situation that is radically different from the preceding situation; "HDTV looks the same but it's really a whole new ballgame"
challenge - a demanding or stimulating situation; "they reacted irrationally to the challenge of Russian power"
childlessness - the condition of being without offspring
complication - a situation or condition that is complex or confused; "her coming was a serious complication"
crowding - a situation in which people or things are crowded together; "he didn't like the crowding on the beach"
disequilibrium - loss of equilibrium attributable to an unstable situation in which some forces outweigh others
element - the situation in which you are happiest and most effective; "in your element"
environment - the totality of surrounding conditions; "he longed for the comfortable environment of his living room"
equilibrium - a stable situation in which forces cancel one another
exclusion - the state of being excluded
fish bowl, fishbowl, goldfish bowl - a state of affairs in which you have no privacy; "the president lives in a goldfish bowl"
hotbed - a situation that is ideal for rapid development (especially of something bad); "it was a hotbed of vice"
inclusion - the state of being included
intestacy - the situation of being or dying without a legally valid will
picture, scene - a situation treated as an observable object; "the political picture is favorable"; "the religious scene in England has changed in the last century"
prison house, prison - a prisonlike situation; a place of seeming confinement
rejection - the state of being rejected
size of it, size - the actual state of affairs; "that's the size of the situation"; "she hates me, that's about the size of it"
square one - the situation in which you begin an endeavor and to which you return if your efforts fail; "the police are now back at square one after having arrested and released 27 men"; "she has tried to diet but always ends up back at square one"
status quo - the existing state of affairs
thing - a special situation; "this thing has got to end"; "it is a remarkable thing"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

state of affairs

noun situation, state, circumstances, scenario, equation, plight, status quo This state of affairs cannot continue for too long.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

state of affairs

ncircostanze fplsituazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The upshot is that true negative causal claims have as their truthmakers actual states of affairs. The lesson is that causally efficacious absences are not ontologically spurious non-entities; they perfectly ordinary entities capable of bearing relations to other things.
If we accept this highly intuitive characterization of causation, then we have, as a consequence, the view that causation is a relation that holds between actual first-order states of affairs. Furthermore, according to Armstrong, the existence of any particular causal relation is entirely independent from what ever else is the case.
Without needing to commit to any specific claims about what states of affairs have most agent-neutral value, we can nevertheless predict that states of affairs which are relatively valuable are also relatively likely to occur--on the grounds that at least some other agents will likely recognize their value, pursue them, and successfully bring them about.
'We will define form-sets as the constituents of states of affairs which can be intersubstituted in states of affairs to form new ones.
We can imagine possible but non-actual states of affairs, such as there being pink elephants, but we cannot image any associated states of affairs in the cases of ungrammatical or meaningless sentences (94).
David Armstrong's most recent (and in some senses ultimate) book is a defence of his view that the world is a world of states of affairs. States of affairs, known to many philosophers as facts, are things like a particular having a property or standing in a relation to another particular, so their constituents are particulars, properties and relations.
In any case, Armstrong points out that these conditionals involve token states of affairs, so they entail nothing about laws, that is, about what happens to other instances of these kinds of states of affairs.
A commonly noted problem with the inconceivability thesis is that it seems plausible to suppose that many states of affairs are inconceivable only because they are beyond our mental powers.
In the Tractatus, using language that goes back to Lotze, Wittgenstein appears to skirt the issue, as he distinguishes the world, that is, "the totality of states of affairs that obtain" (die Gesamtheit der bestehenden Sachverhalte) from actuality (Wirklichkeit) which, he tells us, is "the obtaining and non-obtaining of states of affairs." (16)
In 1997, David Armstrong argued that the world is a world of states of affairs. In his latest book, Truth and Truthmakers, he remains strongly committed to the existence of states of affairs, despite now advocating an ontology in which they are not needed "as an ontological extra." States of affairs remain needed, Armstrong says, "to act as truthmakers for predicative truths." In this paper, the author attempts to shed light on what Armstrong might mean by this claim.