Stationers' Company


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Stationers' Company

n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a guild, established by Royal Charter from Queen Mary in 1557, composed of booksellers, printers, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I was addressing the annual dinner of the Stationers' Company, the City guild of printers and publishers - celebrating the granting of their royal charter in 1557.
Lost Books and Printing in London, 1557-1640: An Analysis of the Stationers' Company Register
In 1610 he entered into an agreement with the Stationers' Company of London under which a copy of every book published in England and registered at Stationers' Hall would be deposited in the new library.
11) before finally alighting on the correct form, Stationers' Company (p.
Erne's positivism, Knight's poststructuralism, and Straznicky's storification of the Stationers' Company convey a knowing optimism about what the field David Kastan referred to as "the New Boredom" can accomplish.
The Stationers' Company and the Printers of London, 1501-1557.
Thomas became not only a bookseller but also a printer and in 1679 won the contract from the Stationers' Company to produce cheap bibles, a deal that came to be worth an estimated PS15,000.
The Stationers' Company, as a guild of publishers, did not have an interest in ensuring that legal deposit occurred.
One was The Ladies' Diary: or Woman's Almanac (edited by Charles Hutton), which had been published by the Stationers' Company annually since 1704 (and would continue until 1841).
According to Sheila Lambert, early Stuart licensing was driven not by the government but by the Stationers' Company, which sought to protect its monopoly on print.
In the second half of the sixteenth century, herbals were being produced at the same time as the printed book and literacy began to thrive (the formation of the Stationers' Company in 1557 signalled the arrival of print as a cultural industry).
"There will continue to be big falls in the amounts of advertising going into newspapers," explained Simon Smallwood, business development director at The Stationers' Company, a 600-year-old trade guild covering the printing, paper and publishing sectors.