statute of limitations

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statute of limitations

n. pl. statutes of limitations
A legal restriction, as by law or court decision, on the time that is allowed to elapse between the arising of a legal claim and the filing of a suit based on such legal claim.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

statute of limitations

n
(Law) a legislative enactment prescribing the period of time within which proceedings must be instituted to enforce a right or bring an action at law. See also laches
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stat′ute of limita′tions


n.
a statute defining the period within which legal action may be taken.
[1760–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

statute of limitations

A statute that sets a time period during which legal proceedings must be begun.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.statute of limitations - a statute prescribing the time period during which legal action can be taken
law - legal document setting forth rules governing a particular kind of activity; "there is a law against kidnapping"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Two years was the "statute of limitations," and after that the victim could not sue.
He was wild when he was young; a long while ago to be sure; but in the law of God, there is no statute of limitations. Ay, it must be that; the ghost of some old sin, the cancer of some concealed disgrace: punishment coming, PEDE CLAUDO, years after memory has forgotten and self-love condoned the fault." And the lawyer, scared by the thought, brooded awhile on his own past, groping in all the corners of memory, least by chance some Jack-in-the-Box of an old iniquity should leap to light there.
The statute of limitation defines the time within which the IRS may initiate an audit of a tax return.
(59) Under the Lockridge ruling, minor children will potentially be able to bring derivative medical malpractice claims long after the two-year statute of limitation. (60) A child born on the date of the alleged malpractice could have up to eight years to file a derivative claim.
TEI maintains statutes of limitation for assessments and refund claims should be equal; unilateral administrative actions should only toll statutes of limitation for a reasonable, limited period; and when a federal change reopens a state or local statute of limitation, any resulting assessment should be limited to the impact of the federal change on the taxpayer's tax liability unless the taxpayer has signed an agreement extending/modifying the jurisdiction's statute of limitation.
An example of when the period of time (the statute of limitation) will be tolled is where the wronged person is a minor; the time will not typically run during the period of minority.
The court held that because the Kirkpatricks' IDEA action was timely filed, the Board's counterclaim related back to the date of the original complaint, and was not barred regardless of the length of the statute of limitation. Id.
Raymer says she made her last payment in 2013, putting the debt outside Oklahoma's five-year statute of limitations. But in 2016, a debt collector, Rausch Sturm, sued for the remaining debt and successfully garnished 19 cents from her checking account before dropping the lawsuit when she challenged it.
The Glendale Republican's latest proposal would increase the statute of limitations for victims to sue their abusers from 20 to 35 years old, while also providing a one-year window for individuals who don't meet that age requirement to also file suit.
The district court concluded that Lund's motion was untimely under each of the potential statutes of limitations and that Lund could not invoke the actual innocence exception to the statute of limitations because his claim of actual innocence was based on a case that interpreted the substantive law of his conviction: Burrage v.
Defendants argued that Alcorn's cause of action is barred by the statute of limitations.