stave church

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Related to Stave churches: Stavkirke

stave church

A Scandinavian timber-framed and timber-walled church built from the eleventh century onward.
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Stave churches, with post-and-lintel construction and distinctive roof lines were common here during the Middle Ages; only 30 remain.
Announcement of competition: Framework agreement video surveillance stave churches
The meticulously sculpted structure, inspired by stave churches of Norway - a country inextricably linked by historic trade to Cardiff - and ad hoc beach shacks of 1960s West Coast America will appear as a functional food and drink outlet.
The wooden stave churches of Sweden, for instance, each serve as a Christian Yggdrasil, "the holy wooden place of protection at the doomsday" (29), with their congregations sheltering within them as Lif and Lifthrasir would.
It's actually a 19th century fish market Clockwise from top left: Squid in shrimp emulsion, Nordisk Spisehus; salted cod, Fiskekoompaniet Restaurant, Tromso, Norway; salted hazlenut icecream, Nordisk Spisehus; and baked scallops and ravioli, Fiskekoompaniet Restaurant in a building inspired by Norway's wooden stave churches that were built without pillars.
It is Norway's second largest city, a charming medieval town founded in 1070, with cobbled streets, a 4,00- year- old harbour fish market, architectural beauty ( the typical Nordic, wooden painted houses or the stave churches are still preserved here) and some great dining ( it is worldrenowned for the fish).
In another tragic but colorful religious history event, Fantoft Church, one of the oldest stave churches in Norway, burned to the ground one night in 1992.
Both volumes are clad in dark stained timber, referencing traditional Norwegian stave churches.
The Norwegians and Swedes are well known for their vertical board-and-batten siding, the origins of which can be directly traced back to their ancient stave churches (Photo 1).
The discussion of Norway's stave churches, whose pagan and Christian elements dovetail with Solness's aspirations, is heady stuff.