steamship

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Related to Steamships: Steam boat

steam·ship

 (stēm′shĭp′)
n.
A ship propelled by one or more steam-driven propellers or paddle wheels.

steamship

(ˈstiːmˌʃɪp)
n
(Nautical Terms) a ship powered by one or more steam-engines

steam•ship

(ˈstimˌʃɪp)

n.
a large commercial vessel, esp. one driven by steam.
[1780–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steamship - a ship powered by one or more steam enginessteamship - a ship powered by one or more steam engines
paddle steamer, paddle-wheeler - a steam vessel propelled by paddle wheels
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
steam engine - external-combustion engine in which heat is used to raise steam which either turns a turbine or forces a piston to move up and down in a cylinder
tramp steamer, tramp - a commercial steamer for hire; one having no regular schedule
Translations
سَفينَه بُخارِيَّه
parník
höyrylaiva
gufubátur
parník
parnik
ångfartyg

steamship

[ˈstiːmʃɪp]
A. Nvapor m, buque m de vapor
B. CPD steamship company, steamship line Ncompañía f naviera

steamship

[ˈstiːmʃɪp] nnavire m à vapeursteam shovel n (US)excavateur msteam train ntrain m à vapeur

steamship

[ˈstiːmˌʃɪp] npiroscafo, nave f a vapore

steam

(stiːm) noun
1. a gas or vapour that rises from hot or boiling water or other liquid. Steam rose from the plate of soup / the wet earth in the hot sun; a cloud of steam; (also adjective) A sauna is a type of steam bath.
2. power or energy obtained from this. The machinery is driven by steam; Diesel fuel has replaced steam on the railways; (also adjective) steam power, steam engines.
verb
1. to give out steam. A kettle was steaming on the stove.
2. (of a ship, train etc) to move by means of steam. The ship steamed across the bay.
3. to cook by steam. The pudding should be steamed for four hours.
steam-
steam-driven / steam-powered machinery.
ˈsteamer noun
a steamboat or steamship.
ˈsteamy adjective
of, or full of, steam. the steamy atmosphere of the laundry.
ˈsteamboat, ˈsteamship nouns
a ship driven by steam.
steam engine
a moving engine for pulling a train, or a fixed engine, driven by steam.
steam roller
a type of vehicle driven by steam, with wide and heavy wheels for flattening the surface of newly-made roads etc.
full steam ahead
at the greatest speed possible.
get steamed up
to get very upset or angry.
get up steam
to build up energy ready for effort.
let off steam
1. to release steam into the air.
2. to release or get rid of excess energy, emotion etc. The children were letting off steam by running about in the playground.
run out of steam
to lose energy, or become exhausted.
steam up
to (cause to) become covered with steam. The windows steamed up / became steamed up.
under one's own steam
by one's own efforts, without help from others. John gave me a lift in his car, but Mary arrived under her own steam.
References in classic literature ?
Then they would seek out the big lumber camps, where there was winter work; or failing in this, would drift to the cities, and live upon what they had managed to save, with the help of such transient work as was there the loading and unloading of steamships and drays, the digging of ditches and the shoveling of snow.
Glancing northwestward, my brother saw the large crescent of shipping already writhing with the approaching terror; one ship passing behind another, another coming round from broadside to end on, steamships whistling and giving off volumes of steam, sails being let out, launches rushing hither and thither.
Somehow or other, as fashions do, the fashion spread; an old monastery was quickly turned into a hotel, while a famous line of steamships altered its route for the convenience of passengers.
And, as regarded steamships and sailing vessels, there were three stewards for every Steward's position.
The Rockefellers went into mines--iron and coal and copper and lead; into other industrial companies; into street railways, into national, state, and municipal bonds; into steamships and steamboats and telegraphy; into real estate, into skyscrapers and residences and hotels and business blocks; into life insurance, into banking.
In other pictures there were steamships, battleships, submarines, and quaint looking railway trains--all small and antiquated in appearance to me, but wonderful to Victory.
Ocean steamships passed up and down the estuary, and lofty-masted ships, towed by red-stacked tugs.
The latter character carried it hollow at this period of the voyage, and triumphed over the Sanguine One at every meal, by inquiring where he supposed the Great Western (which left New York a week after us) was NOW: and where he supposed the 'Cunard' steam-packet was NOW: and what he thought of sailing vessels, as compared with steamships NOW: and so beset his life with pestilent attacks of that kind, that he too was obliged to affect despondency, for very peace and quietude.
His grand-uncle Stephen had built the engines for the Savannah, the first American steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean; and his cousin Alfred was the friend and co-worker of Morse, the inventor of the telegraph.
The great ocean and the commodious steamship filled her with awe.
Fifteen days later, two thousand miles farther off, the Helvetia, of the Compagnie-Nationale, and the Shannon, of the Royal Mail Steamship Company, sailing to windward in that portion of the Atlantic lying between the United States and Europe, respectively signalled the monster to each other in 42@ 15' N.
The steamer which was about to depart from Yokohama to San Francisco belonged to the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, and was named the General Grant.