Steele


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Steele

 (stēl), Sir Richard 1672-1729.
Irish-born English writer of plays and essays who founded and edited The Tatler (1709-1711) and, with Joseph Addison, The Spectator (1711-1712).

Steele

(stiːl)
n
(Biography) Sir Richard. 1672–1729, British essayist and dramatist, born in Ireland; with Joseph Addison he was the chief contributor to the periodicals The Tatler (1709–11) and The Spectator (1711–12)

Steele

(stil)

n.
Sir Richard, 1672–1729, British essayist, playwright, and political leader; born in Ireland.
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References in classic literature ?
Addison and Steele carried on the Tatler for two years, then it was stopped to make way for a far more famous paper called the Spectator.
In order to give interest to the paper, instead of dating the articles from various coffee-houses, as had been done in the Tatler, Addison and Steele between them imagined a club.
But in the days when Joseph Addison and Richard Steele wrote the Spectator, there were no novels.
With Cato Addison reached the highest point of his fame as an author in his own day, but now we remember him much more as a writer of delightful essays, and as the creator or at least the perfecter of Sir Roger, for to Steele is due the first invention of the worthy knight.
Austin Dobson's Selections from Steele (Clarendon Press) prefaced by his careful "Life." The well-known qualities of [10] Mr.
Steele, for one, had certainly succeeded in putting himself, and his way of taking the world--for this pioneer of an everybody's literature had his subjectivities--into books.
The industrious reader, indeed, might select out of these specimens from Steele, a picture, in minute detail, of the characteristic manners of that time.
"Poor little creatures!" said Miss Steele, as soon as they were gone.
"What a sweet woman Lady Middleton is!" said Lucy Steele.
A short pause succeeded this speech, which was first broken by Miss Steele, who seemed very much disposed for conversation, and who now said rather abruptly, "And how do you like Devonshire, Miss Dashwood?
'Spectator' then, and was constantly in the company of Addison, and Steele, and Swift, and Pope, and all the wits at Will's, who are presented evanescently in the romance.
As Sir Richard Steele says, `Gluttons who give high prices for delicacies, are very worthy to be called generous.' In short I am resolved, from this instance, never to give way to the weakness of human nature more, nor to think anything virtue which doth not exactly quadrate with the unerring rule of right."