steeple

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Related to Steeples: staples

stee·ple

 (stē′pəl)
n.
1. A tower rising above the roof of a building, such as a church, and usually surmounted by a spire.
2. A spire.

[Middle English stepel, from Old English stēpel.]

steeple

(ˈstiːpəl)
n
1. (Architecture) a tall ornamental tower that forms the superstructure of a church, temple, etc
2. (Architecture) such a tower with the spire above it
3. any spire or pointed structure
[Old English stēpel; see steep1]
ˈsteepled adj

stee•ple

(ˈsti pəl)

n.
1. an ornamental construction, usu. ending in a spire, erected on a roof or tower of a church, public building, etc.
2. a tower terminating in such a construction.
3. a spire.
[before 1000; Old English stēpel tower. See steep1, -le]
stee′pled, adj.
spire, steeple - A spire is the tall pointed roof of a tower or the tall pointed structure on top of a steeple; a steeple is the tower plus the spire.
See also related terms for tower.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steeple - a tall tower that forms the superstructure of a building (usually a church or temple) and that tapers to a point at the topsteeple - a tall tower that forms the superstructure of a building (usually a church or temple) and that tapers to a point at the top
church service, church - a service conducted in a house of worship; "don't be late for church"
pinnacle - (architecture) a slender upright spire at the top of a buttress of tower
tower - a structure taller than its diameter; can stand alone or be attached to a larger building

steeple

noun spire, tower, belfry The church had a steeple, a bell tower and a clock.
Translations
الجُزْء العُلوي من بُرْج الكَنيسَهبُرْجُ الكَنِيسَة
kostelní věžvěžička
spir
kirkontorni
zvonik
templomtorony
turn
尖塔
뾰족탑
bėgimas su kliūtimis
smailezvanu tornis
kostolná veža
kyrktorn
ยอดหลังคา
kilise kulesikilise/çan kulesi
ngọn tháp

steeple

[ˈstiːpl] Naguja f, chapitel m

steeple

[ˈstiːpəl] nclocher m

steeple

nKirchturm m

steeple

:
steeplechase
n (for horses) → Jagdrennen nt, → Hindernisrennen nt; (for runners) → Hindernislauf m
steeplechaser
n (= horse)Steepler m; (= jockey)Reiter(in) m(f)in einem Jagdrennen; (= runner)Hindernisläufer(in) m(f)
steeplejack
nTurmarbeiter(in) m(f)

steeple

[ˈstiːpl] ncampanile m

steeple

(ˈstiːpl) noun
a high tower of a church etc, usually having a spire.
ˈsteeplechase noun
a race on horseback or on foot across open country, over hedges etc, or over a course on which obstacles (eg fences, hedges etc) have been made.

steeple

بُرْجُ الكَنِيسَة věžička spir Kirchturm καμπαναριό campanario kirkontorni clocher zvonik campanile 尖塔 뾰족탑 torenspits spir wieża campanário, torre da igreja колокольня kyrktorn ยอดหลังคา kilise kulesi ngọn tháp 尖塔
References in classic literature ?
Again, one of his favorite diversions was to watch bellmen ringing the chimes in the church steeples, and though his Puritan conscience insisted that the pleasure was 'vain,' still he would not forego it.
All they could see was a mass of towers and steeples behind the green walls, and high up above everything the spires and dome of the Palace of Oz.
Do you see, close to the college, a large house with steeples, turrets, built in a handsome Gothic style, as that fool, M.
No towers or steeples or domes showed above the enclosure, nor was any living thing to be seen as our friends drew near.
He had but glanced away at the piles of city roofs and chimneys among which the smoke was rolling heavily, and at the wilderness of masts on the river, and the wilderness of steeples on the shore, indistinctly mixed together in the stormy haze, when she was again as quiet as if she had been plying her needle in his mother's room.
"Probably; and those steeples, pointed and sculptured, that we catch a glimpse of yonder, are similar to those that I have heard described at Chambord."
-- It runs: -- Vondervotteimittis -- Vonder, lege Donder -- Votteimittis, quasi und Bleitziz- Bleitziz obsol: -- pro Blitzen." This derivative, to say the truth, is still countenanced by some traces of the electric fluid evident on the summit of the steeple of the House of the Town-Council.
In their midst the central steeple towers proudly up like the mainmast of some great Indiaman among a fleet of coasters.
"I am bringing it from the frownery - the one over there with the gilded steeple."
And the people - ah, the people - They that dwell up in the steeple, All alone, And who, tolling, tolling, tolling, In that muffled monotone, Feel a glory in so rolling On the human heart a stone - They are neither man nor woman - They are neither brute nor human - They are Ghouls: - And their king it is who tolls: - And he rolls, rolls, rolls, rolls, Rolls
But, high up in the steeple! There the foul blast roars and whistles!
From this station, as I pleased myself with imagining, Gage may have beheld his disastrous victory on Bunker Hill (unless one of the tri-mountains intervened), and Howe have marked the approaches of Washington's besieging army; although the buildings since erected in the vicinity have shut out almost every object, save the steeple of the Old South, which seems almost within arm's length.