Stefan's law

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Stefan's law

(ˈstɛfənz)
n
(General Physics) the principle that the energy radiated per second by unit area of a black body at thermodynamic temperature T is directly proportional to T4. The constant of proportionality is the Stefan constant, equal to 5.670400 × 10–8 Wm–2 K–4. Also called: Stefan-Boltzmann law
[C19: named after Josef Stefan (1835–93), Austrian physicist]
References in periodicals archive ?
Among other things, he originated the law that the total radiation from a black body is proportional to the 4th power of its absolute temperature, known as the Stefan-Boltzmann law.
Applying the Stefan-Boltzmann law to the plasma under consideration [10], for its temperature [T.
Here the students apply concepts such as blackbody radiation distributions and the Stefan-Boltzmann law (Maslov 2008).
The power per unit area radiated can be determined by integrating the Planck distribution over all wavelengths, yielding the Stefan-Boltzmann law
The linear dependence in our results is due to the circumstance that the Stefan-Boltzmann law holds for a full range of temperatures, but for narrow temperature ranges it reduces well to a linear dependence.
Such emissions can exceed the Stefan-Boltzmann law by orders of magnitude [18-20].
In one of the very few numerical examples the authors demonstrate the Stefan-Boltzmann law, but use degrees Fahrenheit instead of Kelvin: ".
Voltage across and current through the lamp are recorded at the time of spectra capture, and the power and temperature data are fit with the Stefan-Boltzmann law.