sticheron

(redirected from Stichera)

sticheron

(ˈstɪkəˌrɒn)
n
(Eastern Church (Greek & Russian Orthodox)) a liturgical hymn sung in the Orthodox Church
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The model of a new hymn could also be a singing of hymns from the services to a saint of another rank but having the same divine gift; for example, as discovered by Keller, the kontakion (14) to Sts Martyrs Boris and Gleb, or the altered stichera (15) to St Procopios.
For example, a study by Smirnova has shown that the stichera to Nikita of Pereiaslav (18) were constructed on the model of the sticheron to Sergius of Radonezh, (19) and one of the versions of the service for the Finding of the Relics of St Macarius of Kalyazin (20) can be traced back to the service of St Varlaam of Khutyn.
Most often, borrowed 'updated' hymns were perceived later as 'original', belonging to the new service: for example, the 'updated' stichera for the Transfer of the relics of St.
Table 2: Stichera for the Repose and Transfer of the Relics of St.
The glossary provides the following definition for sticheron: "Stichera are stanzas inserted between verses taken from the Psalms.
114, 115 and 116); (iii) the stichera from the sticherarium; and (iv) the final hymn.
But nothing of this seems to apply to Italian thirteenth-century sources, which depart in unison from the practice of St Sophia in introducing as the respond to the 'Gloria Patri' for each of the three 'little' antiphons the three stichera aposticha of the later form of Byzantine Vespers: [Greek Text Omitted], [Greek Text Omitted] and [Greek Text Omitted].
Its musical style is relatively simple, reminiscent more of the Sticherarion than of the Psaltikon, so it is not surprising that it appears in a thirteenth-century Euchologion thought to come from southern Italy as a respond to the first part of the 'Gloria Patri' concluding the stichera aposticha.(16)
Like these, it also seems to have been more widely distributed, appearing in two sources for Tillyard's Hymns of the Pentecostarium, in one of which (presumably the Codex Peribleptus) it is ascribed to the Emperor Leo.(17) Like the stichera aposticha, therefore, this final hymn shows that the music for the Office of the Genuflexion was put together from books with widely differing styles, ranging from the elaborate psalmody of the opening of the service to the presumably much simpler psalmody of the 'little' antiphons and the hymnodic idiom of the Sticherarion.
The relationship of some of the "stichera" for these saints to those for the feast of SS.
(39) Great Vespers of Transfiguration: Sticheron 1 at the Aposticha (the "Aposticha" are the stichera that appear together with selected Psalms at Vespers).