stinging nettle

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sting·ing nettle

(stĭng′ĭng)
n.
A perennial nettle (Urtica dioica) native to Eurasia and widely distributed in North America. It is sometimes used medicinally, and the young leaves are edible.

stinging nettle

n
(Plants) See nettle1

sting′ing net′tle


n.
a bristly, stinging Eurasian nettle, Urtica dioica, having forked clusters of greenish flowers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stinging nettle - perennial Eurasian nettle established in North America having broad coarsely toothed leaves with copious stinging hairsstinging nettle - perennial Eurasian nettle established in North America having broad coarsely toothed leaves with copious stinging hairs
nettle - any of numerous plants having stinging hairs that cause skin irritation on contact (especially of the genus Urtica or family Urticaceae)
genus Urtica, Urtica - a nettle yielding fiber resembling flax
Translations

stinging nettle

nBrennnessel f

stinging nettle

n (bot) ortiga
References in periodicals archive ?
What type of acid is secreted by red ants and stinging nettles? 8.
Larval food plants belong to the nettle family Urticaceae, and include stinging nettles Urtica incisa and U.
TV show Springwatch wants gardeners to "love and appreciate" stinging nettles.
It is a far cry from the Roman soldiers posted to guard the Roman fortress of Isca who beat themselves with stinging nettles to keep warm.
HE'S climbed Everest, raced to the South Pole and rowed the Atlantic, but it was Countryfile that gave Ben Fogle a special challenge - eating stinging nettles.
So with stinging nettles the latest "cure" taking social media by storm, which treatments really can help?
KEEP CLUMPS OF NETTLES COMMON garden butterflies, such as the red admiral, comma and small tortoiseshell, lay eggs on stinging nettles. The colourful nymphalid butterflies lay eggs on nettle leaves, too, which will provide food for the caterpillars.
Staff posted on Facebook: "Big congratulations to the winners of the world stinging nettles competition.
Maybe?Having grown up in the English countryside, stinging nettles were as much a feature in my life as the grass in which they loved to hide.
it, it cooked ate it wilds Cicely, which grows at the side of the road, provides green pods which have a strong aniseed taste and can be used to flavour vodka, and nasty stinging nettles can become soup.