Stirling engine

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Stirling engine

n.
A heat engine driven by a permanently enclosed gas that expands and contracts as it is alternately heated and cooled by an external source of heat and a heat exchanger.

[After the Reverend Robert Stirling (1790-1878), Scottish clergyman and engineer who invented it.]

Stirling engine

n
(Mechanical Engineering) an external-combustion engine that uses air or an inert gas as the working fluid operating on a highly efficient thermodynamic cycle (the Stirling cycle)
[named after Robert Stirling (1790–1878), Scottish minister who invented it]
References in periodicals archive ?
[17] deliver and investigate the important efforts taken for the development of the Stirling cycle engine and techniques used for engine analysis.
It is regarded as heat sink for stirling cycle while atmosphere is taken as heat source.
Stirling cycle is defined as a ideal reversible thermodynamic cycle with two isothermal process with compression and expansion and two constant volume process with heating and cooling [4].
You can get out and support Legacy Week by taking part in a free family friendly Legacy 2014 cycle ride tomorrow at 10am , starting from the Stirling Cycle Hub at Stirling train station.
J., Thermodynamics and gas dynamic of Stirling cycle machine, 1 edicion.
The analysis presented was applied to specific operating Stirling cycle engines and results were compared to the actual performance of the engines, experimentally determined.
External combustion is represented by the Stirling cycle. He is mainly concerned about gas pressures and changes in them caused by the various forms of applying heat and of altering volume during the operation of the engine.
We show that a determinant of Stirling cycle numbers counts unlabeled acyclic single-source automata.
The system is based on a Stirling cycle which required machining down to 10 to 20[mu] to ensure a very close fit, so there is no possibility of seizing.
The following technologies were selected for initial consideration for the alternative cooling technologies: thermoelectrics, magnetocalorics, thermoacoustics and the Stirling cycle. The reason is that the authors believe these technologies are receiving the most attention.
An integrated MCT detector with a Stirling cycle cooler is available for conditions in which continuous unattended operation is desirable or liquid nitrogen is not available.