Stirling engine

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Stirling engine

n.
A heat engine driven by a permanently enclosed gas that expands and contracts as it is alternately heated and cooled by an external source of heat and a heat exchanger.

[After the Reverend Robert Stirling (1790-1878), Scottish clergyman and engineer who invented it.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Stirling engine

n
(Mechanical Engineering) an external-combustion engine that uses air or an inert gas as the working fluid operating on a highly efficient thermodynamic cycle (the Stirling cycle)
[named after Robert Stirling (1790–1878), Scottish minister who invented it]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Ben Nasrallah, "Thermodynamic analysis of the Stirling heat engine with regenerative losses and internal irreversibilities," International Journal of Engine Research, vol.
The Stirling heat engine, invented by Englishman Robert Stirling in about 1816, is very efficient--far more efficient than an internal combustion engine.