stone axe


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stone axe

n
1. (Archaeology) a primitive axe made of chipped stone
2. (Tools) a blunt axe used for cutting stone
References in classic literature ?
You come of those hairy anthropoid males who hunted their mates through the tangle of primeval forests, and who finally obtained their consent--shall we say?--by clubbing them on the head with a stone axe. You talk a great deal of nonsense about the New Woman, but you, Sir, are THE OLD MALE; and," I continued, "I have only to obtain your wife's consent to take her under my protection this instant."
"He grazed his cattle on these slopes, and he learned to dig for tin when the bronze sword began to supersede the stone axe. Look at the great trench in the opposite hill.
In the centre of the mantel was a stuffed bird-of-paradise, while about the room were scattered gorgeous shells from the southern seas, delicate sprays of coral sprouting from barnacled pi-pi shells and cased in glass, assegais from South Africa, stone axes from New Guinea, huge Alaskan tobacco-pouches beaded with heraldic totem designs, a boomerang from Australia, divers ships in glass bottles, a cannibal kai-kai bowl from the Marquesas, and fragile cabinets from China and the Indies and inlaid with mother-of-pearl and precious woods.
Artefacts, including a polished stone axe have been found nearby, with the remains of an enclosed settlement and possible chapel suspected in the area.
Dr Sherlock, who remembers a stone axe being found there in 1986, said parts of the forest area, which stretches down from Hartlepool, is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), so what's found there is protected.
While there is no reference to the socioeconomic impact of flooding the Aboriginal stone axe 'market' in south-east Australia with metal axes--and thus, theoretically, crashing the 'price' of greenstone--Lauriston Sharp (1952) observed first-hand the detrimental effect that introducing mass-produced steel axes had on the socioeconomic balance of the Yir Yoront on Cape York, Queensland, under similar circumstances.
"The site contains the oldest ground-edge stone axe technology in the world, the oldest known seed-grinding tools in Australia and evidence of finely made stone points which may have served as spear tips," he said, adding "Most striking of all, in a region known for its spectacular rock art, are the huge quantities of ground ochre and evidence of ochre processing found at the site, from the older layer continuing through to the present."
Neolithic stone axe heads were discovered in Bidston (1969) and Caldy (1984).
In the book The Great Divide, geologist Julius von Haast is quoted on his discovery of a stone axe buried five metres underground on the West Coast, underneath what had been a thousand year old beech forest in the mid 1800s.
Mr Jones said there was even a chance the site may have been a stone axe factory, with high-quality stone from Penmaenmawr discovered.