Stonehenge

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Stone·henge

 (stōn′hĕnj′)
A group of standing stones on Salisbury Plain in southern England. Dating to c. 2200-1800 bc, the megaliths are enclosed by a circular ditch and embankment that may date to c. 3000. The arrangement of the stones suggests that Stonehenge was used as a religious center and also as an astronomical observatory.

Stonehenge

(ˌstəʊnˈhɛndʒ)
n
1. (Placename) a prehistoric ruin in S England, in Wiltshire on Salisbury Plain: constructed over the period of roughly 3000–1600 bc; one of the most important megalithic monuments in Europe; believed to have had religious and astronomical purposes
2. (Archaeology) a prehistoric ruin in S England, in Wiltshire on Salisbury Plain: constructed over the period of roughly 3000–1600 bc; one of the most important megalithic monuments in Europe; believed to have had religious and astronomical purposes

Stone•henge

(ˈstoʊn hɛndʒ)

n.
a prehistoric megalithic monument on Salisbury Plain, in S England, dating to late Neolithic and early Bronze Age times (3rd to 2nd millennium B.C.): believed to have had religious or astronomical functions.
[-henge, probably orig. “something hanging”; compare hinge]
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Noun1.Stonehenge - an ancient megalithic monument in southern England; probably used for ritual purposes
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet amongst these ancestral grounds, all that remains of the Tui Cakau's home is a stone hedge that once surrounded it, the rest has been destroyed by the ever-encroaching sea.
On one side of a staggering stone hedge," Mencken observes, "were the bleak, miserable fields of the Arabs, and on the other side were the almost tropical demesnes of the Jews, with long straight rows of green field crops, neat orchards of oranges, lemons and pomegranates, and frequent wood-lots of young but flourishing eucalyptus .
Israeli forces accompanied by military officials bulldozed and destroyed stone hedges and retainers, in addition to olive trees near the Revava settlement, which was built on Deir Estia land, according to Nathmi Salman, mayor of Deir Estia.