stratocumulus

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strat·o·cu·mu·lus

 (străt′ō-kyo͞om′yə-ləs, strā′tō-)
n. pl. strat·o·cu·mu·li (-lī′)
A low-lying cloud formation occurring in extensive horizontal layers with rounded summits.

stratocumulus

(ˌstrætəʊˈkjuːmjʊləs; ˌstreɪtəʊ-)
n, pl -li (-ˌlaɪ)
(Physical Geography) meteorol a uniform stretch of cloud containing dark grey globular masses

stra•to•cu•mu•lus

(ˌstreɪ toʊˈkyu myə ləs, ˌstræt oʊ-)

n., pl. -li (-ˌlaɪ)
a cloud of a class characterized by large dark, rounded masses, usu. in groups, lines, or waves.
[1890–95]

strat·o·cu·mu·lus

(străt′ō-kyo͞om′yə-ləs)
A low-lying, often patchy cloud formation occurring in extensive horizontal layers with distinct, rounded tops.
Translations

stratocumulus

[ˌstreɪtəʊˈkjuːmjʊləs] N (stratocumuli (pl)) [ˌstreɪtəʊˈkjuːmjʊlaɪ]estratocúmulo m
References in periodicals archive ?
In this test, the Citation II flew through a stratocumulus cloud with an outside air temperature at a few degrees below freezing.
For his new group of silkscreens on black MDF (all 2014), Crepieux experimented with a crystalline technique that mimics the process of evaporation in order to render cumulus, stratus, and stratocumulus cloud formations and a stretch of clear sky.
25) for a mixture of air from the top of a stratocumulus cloud and air from just above the inversion.
Entrainment at stratocumulus cloud tops, penetrative entrainment by overshooting cumulus clouds, and lateral entrainment through the sides of cumuli are all separately parameterized in climate models.
From July through October, smoke from biomass-burning (BB) fires on the southern African subcontinent is transported westward through the free troposphere over one of the largest stratocumulus cloud decks on our planet (Fig.
6b, this is the signature of the prevalent stratocumulus cloud cover over the coastal region in the first 1,000 m or so above sea level.
This is suggestive of a potential suppression of precipitation by increased aerosols as has been observed in other stratocumulus cloud regimes (Geoffroy et al.
Furthermore, it was agreed that stratocumulus cloud albedo is sensitive to both natural and anthropogenic atmospheric aerosols (Twomey 1974, 1977), which are both produced in the SEP by desert dust, the ocean, copper smelters (Huneeus et al.
When cold polar air has been over these areas and then a warm southerly flow begins in advance of a weather system to the west, stratus and stratocumulus clouds are brought inland.