stretching

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Related to Strech: stretch reflex, Stretch marks

stretch

 (strĕch)
v. stretched, stretch·ing, stretch·es
v.tr.
1. To lengthen, widen, or distend: stretched the sweater out of shape.
2. To cause to extend from one place to another or across a given space: stretched the banner between two poles.
3. To make taut; tighten: stretched the tarpaulin until it ripped.
4. To reach or put forth; extend: stretched out his hand.
5.
a. To extend (oneself or one's limbs, for example) to full length: stretched her calves before running.
b. To extend (oneself) when lying down: she stretched herself out on the couch.
c. To put to torture on the rack.
6. To wrench or strain (a muscle, for example).
7.
a. To extend or enlarge beyond the usual or proper limits: stretch the meaning of a word.
b. To subject to undue strain: to stretch one's patience.
8.
a. To expand in order to fulfill a larger function: stretch a budget; stretch a paycheck.
b. To increase the quantity of by admixture or dilution: stretch a meal by thinning the stew.
9. To prolong: stretch out an argument.
10. Informal To fell by a blow: stretched his opponent in the first round.
v.intr.
1. To become lengthened, widened, or distended.
2. To extend or reach over a distance or area or in a given direction: "On both sides of us stretched the wet plain" (Ernest Hemingway).
3. To lie down at full length: stretched out on the bed.
4. To extend one's muscles or limbs, as after prolonged sitting or on awakening.
5. To extend over a given period of time: "This story stretches over a whole generation" (William Golding).
n.
1. The act of stretching or the state of being stretched.
2. The extent or scope to which something can be stretched; elasticity.
3. A continuous or unbroken length, area, or expanse: an empty stretch of highway.
4. A straight section of a racecourse or track, especially the section leading to the finish line.
5.
a. A continuous period of time.
b. Slang A term of imprisonment: served a two-year stretch.
c. Informal The last stage of an event, period, or process.
6. Baseball A series of movements in which a pitcher, standing with the glove side facing home plate, raises both hands to the height of the head and then lowers them to the chest or waist for a short pause before pitching the ball. It is used especially when runners are on base because it gives base runners less time to steal than they have during a full windup.
adj.
1. Made of an elastic material that stretches easily: stretch pants.
2. Of, relating to, or being a vehicle, such as a limousine or passenger jet, having an extended seating area that provides extra space for more passengers, leg room, or amenities.
Idiom:
stretch (one's) legs
To go for a walk, especially after a lengthy period of sitting.

[Middle English strecchen, from Old English streccan.]

stretch′a·bil′i·ty n.
stretch′a·ble adj.

stretching

(ˈstrɛtʃɪŋ)
n
the activity of straightening the arms and legs and tightening the muscles

stretching

  • aforcing - The term for stretching the amount of a dish to accommodate more people.
  • extend, extent - Are based on Latin pandere, "stretch."
  • oscitancy, pandiculation - Oscitancy is the act of yawning; pandiculation is an all-over stretching and yawning, as upon waking, from Latin pandere.
  • racking one's brain - Figuratively, it means stretching, and is derived from the Tower of London's torture method.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stretching - act of expanding by lengthening or wideningstretching - act of expanding by lengthening or widening
enlargement, expansion - the act of increasing (something) in size or volume or quantity or scope
tension - the action of stretching something tight; "tension holds the belt in the pulleys"
extension - act of stretching or straightening out a flexed limb
2.stretching - exercise designed to extend the limbs and muscles to their full extent
exercise, exercising, physical exercise, physical exertion, workout - the activity of exerting your muscles in various ways to keep fit; "the doctor recommended regular exercise"; "he did some exercising"; "the physical exertion required by his work kept him fit"
pandiculation - yawning and stretching (as when first waking up)
Translations
strečink

stretching

n. dilatación, estiramiento.

stretching

n estiramiento
References in periodicals archive ?
Retail that fills a need rather than a space is a good practice, said Mikaela Strech, retail strategist at Bethesda, Maryland-based Streetsense.
The spectrum of chitosan shows the characteristic bands at 3350 cm-1 (O-H strech), 2900 cm-1 (aliphatic C-H strech) 1380 cm-1 (C-H bending vibration), 3290 cm-1 (N-H strech) 1640 cm-1 (N-H bending vibration) 1025 and 1062 cm-1 (C-O symmetric and asymmetric vibration at C-O-C bonds) were observed [14-16].
6 RICHARLISON Managed to strech his legs on a few occasions after the break after being shacked for most of the opening period.
The teams travelled on wheelbarrows, diggers, Harley Davidsons and in a pink strech Hummer.
This time last year, by contrast, the region already had been broiled by repeated heat waves, including a blistering four-day strech in late June and early July, with highs of 95, 99, 101 and 100.
The Pod-PRT taxis, part of project Metrino, will cover a 13 KM strech starting from the Guragon-Delhi border, going all the way to Sohna road.
Nurses are integral in identifying wasteful practices in their environment and play a role in decreasing health care costs (Strech & Wyatt, 2013).
Renamo men have been carrying out attacks between this strech since last year.
For Strech 1 and Stretch 2, Arca's recent LPs for New York's UNO label, Ghersi added his own distorted vocals to the mix.
Roads Minister Chris Mole (left) and chief executive of the Highways Agency Graham Dalton survey the new strech of road.
He moved between horses entering the back strech to get to the rail behind the pacesetter, then took Two Step Cat through a narrow opening to split horses in the straight before ending up on the inside in a three-horse, head-bobbing finish.
"Builders are becoming more sophisticated about looking for signs that might present a greater risk," says Mike Strech, director of risk management and insurance for the Sacramento-based California BIA, which drew 128 builders, developers, and insurers to its first-ever risk management seminar, held on April 19 in Irvine, Calif.