streetcar

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street·car

 (strēt′kär′)
n.
A public vehicle operated on rails along a regular route, usually through the streets of a city.

streetcar

(ˈstriːtˌkɑː)
n
(Automotive Engineering) US and Canadian an electrically driven public transport vehicle that runs on rails let into the surface of the road, power usually being taken from an overhead wire. Also called: trolley car, tram (esp Brit) or tramcar

street•car

(ˈstritˌkɑr)

n.
a public vehicle on rails running regularly along city streets.
[1860–65, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.streetcar - a wheeled vehicle that runs on rails and is propelled by electricitystreetcar - a wheeled vehicle that runs on rails and is propelled by electricity
horsecar - an early form of streetcar that was drawn by horses
self-propelled vehicle - a wheeled vehicle that carries in itself a means of propulsion
trolley line - a transit line using streetcars or trolley buses
Translations
تَراممَرْكَبَة الترام
tramvaj
sporvogn
raitiovaunu
tramvaj
villamoskocsi
sporvagn
路面電車
전차
električka
tramvaj
spårvagn
รถราง
tàu điện

streetcar

[ˈstriːtkɑːʳ] N (US) → tranvía m, tren m

streetcar

[ˈstriːtkɑːr] n (US)tramway mstreet child nenfant mf des ruesstreet cleaner n
(= person) → balayeur m
(= machine) → balayeuse fstreet cred (British) street credibility (mainly British) n
to have street cred → jouir du respect de ses pairs, avoir de la street credibility
to lose one's street cred → perdre sa street credibilitystreet crime ndélits mpl sur la voie publiquestreet directory nrépertoire m des ruesstreet fighting ncombats mpl de ruestreet guide nindex m des rues, répertoire m des rues

streetcar

[ˈstriːtˌkɑːʳ] n (Am) → tram m inv

street

(striːt) noun
1. a road with houses, shops etc on one or both sides, in a town or village. the main shopping street; I met her in the street.
2. (abbreviated to St when written) used in the names of certain roads. Her address is 4 Shakespeare St.
ˈstreetcar noun
(especially American) a tramcar.
street directory
a booklet giving an index and plans of a city's streets.
be streets ahead of / better than
to be much better than.
be up someone's street
to be exactly suitable for someone. That job is just up your street.
not to be in the same street as
to be completely different, usually worse, in quality than.

streetcar

تَرام tramvaj sporvogn Straßenbahn τραμ tranvía raitiovaunu tram tramvaj tram 路面電車 전차 tram sporvogn tramwaj bonde, carro elétrico трамвай spårvagn รถราง tramvay tàu điện 有轨电车
References in classic literature ?
When in the evening he came home from work he got off a streetcar and walked sedately along behind some business man, striving to look very substantial and important.
A person who had such a task before him would not need to look very far in Packingtown--he had only to walk up the avenue and read the signs, or get into a streetcar, to obtain full information as to pretty much everything a human creature could need.
In all but a few cases around the world, streetcars are subsidized by government funds.
Streetcars were a form of transportation running within cities, different from interurban lines that connected, say, Elgin to Carpentersville and Aurora, Marston explained.
Plans for Streetcars - said to be like trams but lighter, cheaper and more flexible - were initially mooted by the huge Wirral Waters development project around Birkenhead's East Float over five years ago.
"I have been a vocal critic of the streetcar from beginning, because we have buses that do what streetcars can do without endangering motorcyclists and bicyclists," Hupy said in a written statement.
* BRT vehicles are attractive, just like streetcars.
Others, probably after the streetcars began their test runs, claimed "the streetcars sucked away all the clouds, so the weather was dry."
The Thirty-Year War: A History of Detroit's Streetcars
"There's not a single redeeming thing that can be said about streetcars," opined the Washington Post editorial board in 1962.Thankfully, this "hopeless anachronism" in America's capital city had just "clunked its last." Streetcars were beset by technical and logistical flaws that made daily commutes invariably unpleasant, so overwhelmingly Washingtonians were happy to see them go.
The union representing 900 workers at Thunder Bay's Bombardier promised to redouble its efforts to fast track the delivery of new streetcars to the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC).