Strepsiptera

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Strep`sip´te`ra


n. pl.1.(Zool.) A group of small insects having the anterior wings rudimentary, and in the form of short and slender twisted appendages, while the posterior ones are large and membranous. They are parasitic in the larval state on bees, wasps, and the like; - called also Rhipiptera. See Illust. under Rhipipter.
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper introduces a black light technique to capture the crepuscular strepsipteran Elenchus koebelei Pierce (Strepsiptera: Elenchidae).
Each contained a single female strepsipteran. The first was a male collected on 15 March 2010 at Encinitos Ranch, 18 mi SW of Rachal, Brooks County, Texas (JLN #33813) and the second a female at the Chaparral Wildlife Management Area, Dimmit County, Texas (JLN #33934) on 2 April 2010.
These parasitoids, the strepsipteran Elenchus koebelei and the dryinid Pseudogonatopus arizonicus were found in only 8.3% and 0.03%, respectively, of hosts sampled.
At least 44 fire ant natural enemies have been identified in South America: Pseudacteon fly parasitoids (23 species), microsporidia (Vairimorpha invictae and Kneallhazia solenopsae),fungus (Myrmecomyces annellisae), nematodes (Allomermis solenopsi, Tetradonema solenopsis, and Hexamerma spp.), eucharitid wasps (5 species), scarab beetle (Martineziana dutertrei), strepsipteran (Caenocholax fenyesi), parasitic ant (Solenopsis daguerrei), densovirus (Solenopsis invicta densovirus, SiDNV), and RNA viruses (3 viruses) (Wojcik et al.
-- A positive size correlation exists between the emerging adult male strepsipteran parasite Caenocholax fenyesi Pierce and its host Solenopsis invicta Buren.
The strepsipteran Caenocholax fenyesi Pierce sensu lato has been recorded from Mexico and the southern United States (Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas) (Kathirithamby & Taylor 2005).
Also in that habitat, dryinids (Hymenoptera) and strepsipterans parasitized the most abun dant leafhoppers inhabiting edge grasses in winter, including S.