streptococcus

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strep·to·coc·cus

 (strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. strep·to·coc·ci (-kŏk′sī, -kŏk′ī)
Any of various round gram-positive bacteria of the genus Streptococcus that occur in pairs or chains and can cause various infections in humans, including strep throat, erysipelas, and scarlet fever.

strep·to·coc·cal (-kŏk′əl), strep·to·coc·cic (-kŏk′sĭk, -kŏk′ĭk) adj.

streptococcus

(ˌstrɛptəʊˈkɒkəs)
n, pl -cocci (-ˈkɒkaɪ; US -ˈkɒksaɪ)
(Microbiology) any Gram-positive spherical bacterium of the genus Streptococcus, typically occurring in chains and including many pathogenic species, such as S. pyogenes, which causes scarlet fever, sore throat, etc: family Lactobacillaceae. Often shortened to: strep
streptococcal, streptococcic adj

strep•to•coc•cus

(ˌstrɛp təˈkɒk əs)

n., pl. -coc•ci (-ˈkɒk saɪ, -si)
any of several spherical bacteria of the genus Streptococcus, occurring in pairs or chains, species of which cause such diseases as tonsillitis, pneumonia, and scarlet fever.
[1875–80; < New Latin; see strepto-, coccus]
strep`to•coc′cal (-ˈkɒk əl) strep`to•coc′cic (-ˈkɒk sɪk) adj.

strep·to·coc·cus

(strĕp′tə-kŏk′əs)
Plural streptococci (strĕp′tə-kŏk′sī, strĕp′tə-kŏk′ī)
Any of various bacteria that are normally found on the skin and mucous membranes and in the digestive tract of mammals. One kind of streptococcus causes especially severe infections in humans, including strep throat, scarlet fever, pneumonia, and blood infections.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.streptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chainsstreptococcus - spherical Gram-positive bacteria occurring in pairs or chains; cause e.g. scarlet fever and tonsillitis
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
genus Streptococcus - a genus of bacteria
Translations
streptobacillestreptococciestreptocoque

streptococcus

[ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkəs] N (streptococci (pl)) [ˌstreptəʊˈkɒkaɪ]estreptococo m

streptococcus

n pl <streptococci> → Streptokokkus m

strep·to·coc·cus

n. estreptococo, género de microorganismo de la tribu Streptococceae, bacterias gram-positivas que se agrupan en pares o cadenas y que causan enfermedades serias.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: The use of antacids in addition to conventional periodontal treatment may be effective in the treatment of oral streptococcal infections.
There are several streptococcal infections that can be cause by the streptococcus bacteria ranging from the more mild and highly common throat infections to more serious infections of the blood or organs, (https://www.
Increase in invasive emm1 group A streptococcal infections in Nord and Pas de Calais departments in 2016 [in French] [cited 2016 Dec 26].
PANS broadened the concept of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatrie disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), which was first described in 1998, although it's been known for generations that acute streptococcus infections can lead to abrupt psychiatric symptoms.
The clinical features of Group G streptococcal infections can be attributed to its virulence factors which include adhesins, toxins, and proteases.
The Townsville facility will have a particular focus on the prevention and treatment of tropical diseases, such as dengue fever, Q fever, streptococcal infections, malaria and tuberculosis as well as peripheral artery disease, Ms Palaszczuk said.
Special educators and researchers advise school professionals on dealing with students who have pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDA) or pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) or conditions with similar symptoms.
Global Markets Direct's, 'Streptococcal Infections - Pipeline Review, H1 2016', provides an overview of the Streptococcal Infections pipeline landscape.
A community based study of the rate of beta-haemolytic group a streptococcal infections in symptomatic and asymptomatic school children.
Close monitoring, rapid and decisive response to potential outbreaks and early treatment of scarlet fever with an appropriate antibiotic remains essential, especially given the potential complications associated with group A streptococcal infections.
Support for this hypothesis comes from the identification of a subgroup of children, described by the term pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), with the onset of OCD symptoms following streptococcal infections (1).
The reason this message is important is because sulfa drugs are unreliable for the treatment of streptococcal infections.

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