stretch marks

(redirected from Striae Distensae)
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Related to Striae Distensae: Stretch marks

stretch marks

If the skin is stretched too much (for example, during pregnancy or by rapid weight gain), then the dermis may be torn. This can be seen on the skin as lines called stretch marks, or striae – at first red, turning silvery white.
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Translations

stretch marks

nplsmagliature fpl
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Striae gravidarum (SG, also called' striae distensae') is a common condition observed in pregnancy to various extents.
We and other authors believe that physiological striae atrophicae of adolescence and striae distensae (stretch marks) are separate disease entities [3,4,8].
Striae distensae, or stretch marks, are linear scars in the dermis which arise from rapid stretching of the skin over weakened connective tissue.
Striae distensae also are common in obese patients, typically affecting the breasts, buttocks, and thighs.
Known to doctors as striae distensae, stretch marks may occur after weight loss or pregnancy (or even in weightlifters, particularly if they use steroids).
Results: Most common physiological skin changes were pigmentary (98%) followed by striae distensae (76%), glandular changes (15.4%) and vascular (10%).
Gross distension of abdomen with adrenocortical activities are responsible for the red-blue depressed streaks seen on abdomen and breasts in 70-90% pregnancies, called striae distensae. (5,14) These usually develop in the second trimester.
Striae distensae was seen in 70% of patients, but was seen as incidental findings in patients who presented with other skin disorders.
A significant higher percentage for diabetes mellitus (OR=2.455; p=0.028), striae distensae (OR=2.279; p=0.044), and acanthosis nigricans (OR=3.857; p=0.001) was seen when patients of group CII and CI were compared; while acne was found to be more statistically significant in patients of group CI compared to group CII (OR=0.259; p=0.001).
Chronic Liver Disease can give rise to numerous extrahepatic disorders among which skin disease occupy a central place Jaundice, xerosis, pruritis, pigmentary changes, loss of pubic and axillary hairs, leuconychia, spider naevi, telangiectasias, striae distensae with dilated veins on abdomen, palmar erythema all are recognized sequelae of liver disease (12, 14).