confidentiality

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con·fi·den·tial

 (kŏn′fĭ-dĕn′shəl)
adj.
1. Done or communicated in confidence; secret.
2. Entrusted with the confidence of another: a confidential secretary.
3. Denoting confidence or intimacy: a confidential tone of voice.
4. Containing information, the unauthorized disclosure of which poses a threat to national security.

con′fi·den′ti·al′i·ty (-shē-ăl′ĭ-tē), con′fi·den′tial·ness n.
con′fi·den′tial·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.confidentiality - the state of being secret; "you must respect the confidentiality of your client's communications"
concealment, privateness, secrecy, privacy - the condition of being concealed or hidden
2.confidentiality - discretion in keeping secret information
circumspection, discreetness, discretion, prudence - knowing how to avoid embarrassment or distress; "the servants showed great tact and discretion"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ثِقَه، سِرِّيّه، ائتِمان
důvěrnosttajnost
fortrolighed
trúnaîur
gizlilik

confidentiality

[ˌkɒnfɪˌdenʃɪˈælɪtɪ] Nconfidencialidad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

confidentiality

[ˌkɒnfɪdɛnʃiˈælɪti] n [information, report, document] → confidentialité f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

confidentiality

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

confidentiality

[ˌkɒnfɪˌdɛnʃɪˈælɪtɪ] nriservatezza, carattere m confidenziale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

confide

(kənˈfaid) verb
to tell one's private thoughts to someone. He confided in his brother; He confided his fears to his brother.
confidence (ˈkonfidəns) noun
1. trust or belief in someone's ability. I have great confidence in you.
2. belief and faith in one's own ability. She shows a great deal of confidence for her age.
confident (ˈkonfidənt) adjective
having a great deal of trust (especially in oneself). She is confident that she will win; a confident boy.
confidential (konfiˈdenʃəl) adjective
1. secret; not to be told to others. confidential information.
2. trusted to keep secrets. a confidential secretary.
confidentiality (ˈkonfidenʃiˈӕləti) noun
ˌconfiˈdentially adverb
secretly; not wishing to have the information passed on to anyone else. She could not tell me what he said – he was speaking confidentially.
conˈfiding adjective
trustful.
conˈfidingly adverb
in confidence
as a secret; confidentially. He told me the story in (strictest) confidence.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

n. confidencialidad.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

confidentiality

n intimidad f, confidencialidad f patient — intimidad or confidencialidad del paciente
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Losberne, in strict confidence afterwards, that he considers it an excellent performance, but deems it as well not to say so.
My present obligation merely binds me to tell you--in strict confidence, mind!--that Miss Silvester's secrets are no secrets to Mr.
When Becky told her father, in strict confidence, how Tom had taken her whipping at school, the Judge was visibly moved; and when she pleaded grace for the mighty lie which Tom had told in order to shift that whipping from her shoulders to his own, the Judge said with a fine outburst that it was a noble, a generous, a mag- nanimous lie -- a lie that was worthy to hold up its head and march down through history breast to breast with George Washington's lauded Truth about the hatchet!
"Which I meantersay, Pip," Joe now observed in a manner that was at once expressive of forcible argumentation, strict confidence, and great politeness, "as I hup and married your sister, and I were at the time what you might call (if you was anyways inclined) a single man."
Papers and precious matters were this very day brought to us here (I speak in strict confidence; it is not business-like to whisper it, even to you), by the strangest bearers you can imagine, every one of whom had his head hanging on by a single hair as he passed the Barriers.
'I mention it as the friend of both parties, and in strict confidence. I don't agree with him, you know.
And more than that; I promise to have no secrets from you, Pa, and you may make certain that, whatever mercenary things go on, I shall always tell you all about them in strict confidence.'
At present, I don't mind confessing to the wards in Jarndyce (in strict confidence) that I sometimes find it difficult to keep up a genteel appearance.
Mine is a confidential trade like yours, and I will treat anything you write for me in strict confidence. But write the whole."
All information will be treated in strict confidence," she said.
The individuals in question were in the main stand of Ochilview Park on Saturday and anyone with information is urged to contact the club on 01324 624121 in strict confidence.