strong verb


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strong verb

(Gram) nverbo forte
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For example, a strong verb strike whose past form was inflected as 'stroke' could change to 'struck' due to analogy with 'stuck'.
According to Bybee, however, the fact that, in the strong verb, there is a stem-vowel alternation associated with tense while the shape of the stem remains constant across the person number forms within each tense diagrams the facts that (1) tense has more of an effect on the meaning of a verb than does person or number agreement; and consequently (2) all the forms of a given tense are more closely related semantically than are any forms across tenses.
By focusing on the morphological class of the weak verb, Schuldt (1905) finds that some weak verbs from class 1 display the vowel of the preterite singular of the strong verb (bastan 'to bridle' ~ bitan 'to bite').
In Akkadian the imperative of I-a verbs regularly has an [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in the first syllable despite the usual vowel harmony found in the strong verb, as in amur < *'mur "see
I introduce this brief allusion to the strong verb since it will have some significance in what follows, and not just because in this case stem formation lacks an obvious derivational role.
First, there is the West Germanic strong verb *serdan 'futuere', attested in Old Norse seroa (with a metathesized variant streoa) and Middle High German serten.
Relating the derivative to three bases of derivation that include a strong verb and share a consonant sequence is tantamount to saying that the strong verb stem is the base of derivation, that is, the derivational paradigm that follows in Table 2 can be reconstructed for leogan on the grounds of morphological relatedness, including word-formation proper (productive) and redundancy (recoverable): (6)
The limited vocabulary and speed of introduction to all of the binyanim of a strong verb make this largely deductive grammar especially appropriate for the niche of compressed-time courses in the North American academic and theological school markets.
12) In ST the situation is somewhat different; the strong verb tense markers are kkr and pp, but the weak verb tense markers are r and v.
This study focuses on a single aspect of the verbal system in medieval Irish English, namely on the developments in the strong verb system.
They were most regularly preserved in the strong verb paradigm where they emerged as: [thorn] ~ d, h ~ g/w, h ~ ng, s ~ r, as in sni[thorn]an: sna[thorn]: snidon: sniden, ceosan: ceas: curon: coren, teon: teah: tugon: togen.
It concerns Old English strong verbs, where Hogg felt it necessary to go back all the way to Proto-Indo-European ablaut, introducing concepts such as quantitative and qualitative gradation in an attempt to show the reader the underlying--and diachronic--unity of the strong verb group.