strong verb


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Translations

strong verb

(Gram) nverbo forte
References in periodicals archive ?
Here she combines information on the strong verb, the double, the hamzated, and the weak verbs, with references to her earlier specialized publications on each one.
The first was the adoption of what was termed a strong verb, this being an active or transitive verb, in a relationship with both the subject (the concept in the central node) and the object (the sub-concept in the first layer of nodes).
Arabic Proverbs and Wise Sayings," "Arabic Love Poetry from the Desert: Majnun Leyla," "Arabic Morphology and Phonology based on the Marah," "The Complexity of the Irregular Verbal Nominal Forms & the Phonological Changes in Arabic," "The Essentials of the Class of the Strong Verb in Arabic," "A Study of the Assimilation and Substitution in Arabic," "The Phonological Changes due to the Hamza and Weak Consonant in Arabic," "The Basics & Intricacies of Arabic Morphology," "A Study of Arabic Phonology" and "Causes and Principles in Arabic.
I think proving is a pretty strong verb choice there.
Article 11 includes a strong verb (Aowe urgeAo) and refers to IranAAEs full compliance with NPT and IAEA rules.
While I can understand the rationale behind Walker-Jones' decision to introduce the weak verb from the outset (the most commonly occurring verbs are weak), introducing the strong verb [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 'write' only on p.
For example, a strong verb strike whose past form was inflected as 'stroke' could change to 'struck' due to analogy with 'stuck'.
According to Bybee, however, the fact that, in the strong verb, there is a stem-vowel alternation associated with tense while the shape of the stem remains constant across the person number forms within each tense diagrams the facts that (1) tense has more of an effect on the meaning of a verb than does person or number agreement; and consequently (2) all the forms of a given tense are more closely related semantically than are any forms across tenses.
This form evidently represents some part of the Old English wrecan, 'to utter',(4) a strong verb of Class V; but which part?
By focusing on the morphological class of the weak verb, Schuldt (1905) finds that some weak verbs from class 1 display the vowel of the preterite singular of the strong verb (bastan 'to bridle' ~ bitan 'to bite').
Most of them belong to strong verb paradigms: 2,115 lost Old English adjectives have strong verbs as direct or indirect bases of derivation, 43.
In Akkadian the imperative of I-a verbs regularly has an [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in the first syllable despite the usual vowel harmony found in the strong verb, as in amur < *'mur "see