structuralism

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struc·tur·al·ism

 (strŭk′chər-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A method of analyzing phenomena, as in anthropology, linguistics, psychology, or literature, chiefly characterized by contrasting the elemental components of the phenomena in a system of binary opposition and examining how the elemental components are combined to make larger units.

struc′tur·al·ist adj. & n.

structuralism

(ˈstrʌktʃərəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) an approach to anthropology and other social sciences and to literature that interprets and analyses its material in terms of oppositions, contrasts, and hierarchical structures, esp as they might reflect universal mental characteristics or organizing principles. Compare functionalism
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an approach to anthropology and other social sciences and to literature that interprets and analyses its material in terms of oppositions, contrasts, and hierarchical structures, esp as they might reflect universal mental characteristics or organizing principles. Compare functionalism
3. (Linguistics) an approach to linguistics that analyses and describes the structure of language, as distinguished from its comparative and historical aspects
ˈstructuralist n, adj

struc•tur•al•ism

(ˈstrʌk tʃər əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. any study or theory that embodies structural principles.
4. a school of psychology that analyzes conscious mental activity by studying the hierarchical association of structures, or complex ideas, with simpler ideas, perceptions, and sensations.
[1945–50]
struc′tur•al•ist, n., adj.
struc`tur•al•is′tic, adj.

structuralism

an emphasis in research and description upon the systematic relations of formal distinctions in a given language. Also called structural linguistics. — structuralist, n.
See also: Linguistics
functionalism.
See also: Architecture

structuralism

1. An approach to the study of language that concentrates on its internal structure as opposed to the history of its development or its relationships with other languages.
2. A critical discipline which studies a text in relation to other known elements, including knowledge of the author, contemporaneous culture, literary convention, and facts not mentioned in the text but known to intended readers in addition to the text itself.
3. Structural anthropologists see cultural forms (e.g. customs, language, and tools used by man) as projections into this world of the inner workings of the human mind. The task of anthropology is to decode these cultural forms to reveal the principles through which the human mind operates.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.structuralism - linguistics defined as the analysis of formal structures in a text or discourse
linguistics - the scientific study of language
2.structuralism - an anthropological theory that there are unobservable social structures that generate observable social phenomena
theory - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; "theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypotheses"; "true in fact and theory"
anthropology - the social science that studies the origins and social relationships of human beings
3.structuralism - a sociological theory based on the premise that society comes before individuals
theory - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; "theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypotheses"; "true in fact and theory"
sociology - the study and classification of human societies
Translations
strukturalizmus

structuralism

[ˈstrʌktʃərəlɪzəm] Nestructuralismo m

structuralism

nder Strukturalismus

structuralism

[ˈstrʌktʃrəˌlɪzm] nstrutturalismo
References in periodicals archive ?
The essay suggests that although this structuralist view is silent on whether empty space has a phenomenal appearance, the very appeal to structural features seems a natural foil to some such thought.
The writings address class analysis and colonial immigrants; the sociology of special education; why special education became an entrenched part of education systems; the links between special education and vocational education, skill training, and employment; conflicts and dilemmas when professionals are employed by educational bureaucracies to deal with students viewed as ospecialo or disabled; the rise of the special educational needs industry in the UK; the radical structuralist view of special education and disability; race issues; British national identity; education reforms; home-school partnerships; education in a post-welfare society; what is happening to low attainers in a global knowledge economy; and disability in Somaliland.
Finally, the structuralist view is substituted in linguistics by text semiotics which directs the research towards a pragmatic aim including also in its domain the extralinguistic components.