Stuckism

(redirected from Stuckists)

Stuckism

(ˈstʌkɪzəm)
n
(Art Movements) a British art movement, founded in 1999 by Billy Childish (born 1959) and Charles Thomson (born 1953) to advance new figurative painting (as opposed to conceptual art)
ˈStuckist n, adj
References in periodicals archive ?
Odeon, today, various times EXHIBITION The Stuckists Stuckist artists work in a great variety of different ways and different subjects.
There is even a group of artists called The Stuckists who protest about what they see as the domination of conceptual art over more traditional art.
Anyway, you want to write about the Stuckists instead?
Founded in 1999 by Charles Thomson and Billy Childish, the Stuckists promote "figurative painting with ideas" and oppose conceptual art.
The Stuckists are an international art movement of over 200 groups in 48 countries.
Every year there is a protest by a group of artists who call themselves Stuckists (referring to Emin's opinion that their art is "stuck") led by Billy Childish.
Charles Thomson, co-founder of the Stuckists said: "I hope this will bring a bit of sanity into things as it's quite obvious that the art world has gone stark raving bonkers.
OK, not everybody--no doubt veteran protesters the Stuckists will once again camp out on Tate Britain's steps during the show's run, wailing that there are no proper figurative painters amid the short list of Kutlug Ataman, Jeremy Deller, Langlands & Bell, and Yinka Shonibare--but this year in particular the jurors (including curators Catherine David and David Thorp and British art critic Adrian Searle) appear mostly concerned with offering palliative nods of recognition to known quantities who have previously, and in some cases inexplicably, been overlooked.
And with that in mind it might well make sense to the Stuckists to broaden their horizons by switching on the lights of comprehension and for conceptualists to become a touch more self-conscious and start to undress their minds in less shadowy corners.
There was also a separate protest outside the gallery by a group of artists calling themselves The Stuckists who said the shortlisted work was "pretentious and vacuous".
Stuckists championed a return to art as a form of communication and expression rather than the nihilism and novelty of conceptual art.
The current exhibition has been in the pipeline since the Walker exhibition in 2004 - with the Stuckists returning in between for the 2006 Biennial with the show The Truimph of Stuckism at Liverpool School of Art and Design.