substratum

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sub·stra·tum

(sŭb′strā′təm, -străt′əm)
n. pl. sub·stra·ta (-strā′tə, -străt′ə) or sub·stra·tums
1.
a. An underlying layer.
b. A layer of earth beneath the surface soil; subsoil.
2. A foundation or groundwork.
3. The material on which another material is coated or fabricated.
4. Philosophy The underlying characterless substance that supports attributes of material reality.
5. Biology A substrate.
6. Linguistics A substrate.

[New Latin substrātum, from neuter of Latin substrātus, past participle of substernere, to lay under : sub-, sub- + sternere, to stretch, spread; see ster-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

sub·stra′tive adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

substratum

(sʌbˈstrɑːtəm; -ˈstreɪ-)
n, pl -strata (-ˈstrɑːtə; -ˈstreɪtə)
1. any layer or stratum lying underneath another
2. a basis or foundation; groundwork
3. (Biology) the nonliving material on which an animal or plant grows or lives
4. (Geological Science) geology
a. the solid rock underlying soils, gravels, etc; bedrock
b. the surface to which a fixed organism is attached
5. (Sociology) sociol any of several subdivisions or grades within a stratum
6. (Photography) photog a binding layer by which an emulsion is made to adhere to a glass or film base. Sometimes shortened to: sub
7. (Philosophy) philosophy substance considered as that in which attributes and accidents inhere
8. (Linguistics) linguistics the language of an indigenous population when replaced by the language of a conquering or colonizing population, esp as it influences the form of the dominant language or of any mixed languages arising from their contact. Compare superstratum2
[C17: from New Latin, from Latin substrātus strewn beneath, from substernere to spread under, from sub- + sternere to spread]
subˈstrative, subˈstratal adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sub•stra•tum

(ˈsʌbˌstreɪ təm, -ˌstræt əm, sʌbˈstreɪ təm, -ˈstræt əm)

n., pl. -stra•ta (-ˌstreɪ tə, -ˌstræt ə, -ˈstreɪ tə, -ˈstræt ə) -stra•tums.
1. something that is spread or laid under something else; a stratum or layer lying under another.
2. something that underlies or serves as a basis or foundation.
3. the subsoil.
[1625–35; < New Latin; see sub-, stratum]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.substratum - a surface on which an organism grows or is attached; "the gardener talked about the proper substrate for acid-loving plants"
surface - the extended two-dimensional outer boundary of a three-dimensional object; "they skimmed over the surface of the water"; "a brush small enough to clean every dental surface"; "the sun has no distinct surface"
2.substratum - any stratum or layer lying underneath another
stratum - one of several parallel layers of material arranged one on top of another (such as a layer of tissue or cells in an organism or a layer of sedimentary rock)
3.substratum - an indigenous language that contributes features to the language of an invading people who impose their language on the indigenous population; "the Celtic languages of Britain are a substrate for English"
indigenous language - a language that originated in a specified place and was not brought to that place from elsewhere
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

substratum

noun
The lowest or supporting part or structure:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

substratum

[ˈsʌbˈstrɑːtəm] N (substrata (pl)) [ˈsʌbˈstrɑːtə]sustrato m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

substratum

n pl <substrata> → Substrat nt; (Geol) → Untergrund m; (Sociol) → Substratum nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

substratum

[sʌbˈstrɑːtəm] n (substrata (pl)) [sʌbˈstrɑːtə] (Geol) (fig) → sostrato
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sub·stra·tum

n. sustrato, fundación, base en la que vive un organismo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"In the Germany of the last century, which I know better than the present one, there was a solid sub-stratum of friendship, not to say love, for England, based on racial, religious and intellectual ties, and I decline to believe that the tension of the last 10 years has entirely obliterated that feeling.
A computer-controlled atomic-forged process creates a molecular bonding of select exotic metals and other elements, forging a pre-determined and distinct number of atomic layers both sub-stratum and above the surface of the 420 stainless steel substrate brake rotor.
Share of each sub-stratum in total household income, 1992, 2002, and 2010 Gross median income of households headed by wage earners, in percentages 1992 2002 2010 Lower-bottom stratum 5.0 4.8 4.9 Upper-bottom stratum 8.5 8.3 8.3 Lower-middle stratum 10.8 9.2 9.3 Upper-middle stratum 13.9 11.8 12.0 Lower-top stratum 22.2 21.8 22.4 Upper-top stratum 39.6 44.2 43.1 Total 100 100 100 Source: Adva Center analysis of CBS, Income Surveys, 1992, 2002, 2010 Table 5.