subculture

(redirected from Subcultural capital)
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Related to Subcultural capital: Cultural capital

sub·cul·ture

 (sŭb′kŭl′chər)
n.
1. A cultural subgroup differentiated by status, ethnic background, residence, religion, or other factors that functionally unify the group and act collectively on each member.
2. One culture of microorganisms derived from another.

sub·cul′tur·al adj.

subculture

n
1. (Sociology) a subdivision of a national culture or an enclave within it with a distinct integrated network of behaviour, beliefs, and attitudes
2. (Microbiology) a culture of microorganisms derived from another culture
vb
(Microbiology) (tr) to inoculate (bacteria from one culture medium) onto another medium
subˈcultural adj

sub•cul•ture

(n. ˈsʌbˌkʌl tʃər; v. sʌbˈkʌl tʃər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1.
a. a group having social, economic, ethnic, or other traits distinctive enough to distinguish it from others within the same culture or society.
b. the cultural patterns distinctive of such a group.
2. a bacterial culture derived from a strain that has been recultivated on a different medium.
v.t.
3. to cultivate (a bacterial strain) again on a different medium.
[1895–1900]
sub•cul′tur•al, adj.
sub•cul′tur•al•ly, adv.

subculture


Past participle: subcultured
Gerund: subculturing

Imperative
subculture
subculture
Present
I subculture
you subculture
he/she/it subcultures
we subculture
you subculture
they subculture
Preterite
I subcultured
you subcultured
he/she/it subcultured
we subcultured
you subcultured
they subcultured
Present Continuous
I am subculturing
you are subculturing
he/she/it is subculturing
we are subculturing
you are subculturing
they are subculturing
Present Perfect
I have subcultured
you have subcultured
he/she/it has subcultured
we have subcultured
you have subcultured
they have subcultured
Past Continuous
I was subculturing
you were subculturing
he/she/it was subculturing
we were subculturing
you were subculturing
they were subculturing
Past Perfect
I had subcultured
you had subcultured
he/she/it had subcultured
we had subcultured
you had subcultured
they had subcultured
Future
I will subculture
you will subculture
he/she/it will subculture
we will subculture
you will subculture
they will subculture
Future Perfect
I will have subcultured
you will have subcultured
he/she/it will have subcultured
we will have subcultured
you will have subcultured
they will have subcultured
Future Continuous
I will be subculturing
you will be subculturing
he/she/it will be subculturing
we will be subculturing
you will be subculturing
they will be subculturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been subculturing
you have been subculturing
he/she/it has been subculturing
we have been subculturing
you have been subculturing
they have been subculturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been subculturing
you will have been subculturing
he/she/it will have been subculturing
we will have been subculturing
you will have been subculturing
they will have been subculturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been subculturing
you had been subculturing
he/she/it had been subculturing
we had been subculturing
you had been subculturing
they had been subculturing
Conditional
I would subculture
you would subculture
he/she/it would subculture
we would subculture
you would subculture
they would subculture
Past Conditional
I would have subcultured
you would have subcultured
he/she/it would have subcultured
we would have subcultured
you would have subcultured
they would have subcultured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subculture - a social group within a national culture that has distinctive patterns of behavior and beliefs
social group - people sharing some social relation
culture, civilisation, civilization - a particular society at a particular time and place; "early Mayan civilization"
suburbia - suburbanites considered as a cultural class or subculture
youth culture - young adults (a generational unit) considered as a cultural class or subculture
psychedelia - the subculture of users of psychedelic drugs
Translations

subculture

[ˈsʌbˌkʌltʃəʳ] Nsubcultura f

subculture

sub-culture [ˈsʌbkʌltʃər] nsous-culture f

subculture

[ˈsʌbˌkʌltʃəʳ] nsottocultura

sub·cul·ture

n. subcultivo, cultivo de bacterias que se deriva de otro.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alan explains how Twitter helps him to gain more subcultural capital.
In music, a high level of subcultural capital can be gained through establishing a distinct artistic style, defying genre lines, and appealing to a variety of audiences while simultaneously captivating small music subcultures.
Crackers intentionally labeled themselves as deviants to gain subcultural capital by emphasizing the illegality of the practices of cracking and game distribution (for further discussion on subcultural capital, see Thornton, 2010).
Ann Webb Sarah, your background is in art history and your thesis for your PhD in the sociology of culture was published as a book titled, Club Cultures: Music, Media, and Subcultural Capital.
Japanese donnettes, DJs, and dreads travel to Jamaica in pursuit of subcultural capital, such as adeptness at speaking in Jamaican patois, a process Sterling deftly refers to as "seeking to prove their mettle at the artistic source" (p.
Do not specialise too much or become enthralled by subcultural capital.
Cairns is justified in such warnings, particularly given the pejorative nature of so many images of lesbianism, but a further sophistication would have been adequately to recognize that her 'responsible' stance is informed by the high level of cultural and subcultural capital she brings to each film viewing.
In Pierre Bourdieu's terms, both dealers have high volumes of cultural capital, but while Gagosian has relatively unrivaled economic capital, GBE is rich in subcultural capital.
This was why heavy metal had so little subcultural capital, dominated as it was before punk by megabands working for the main production labels, themselves often with a controlling share in large retailers or huge concert events that dominated suburban America where heavy metal sold so well.
It is possible for young people to have subcultural capital without the social capital traditionally tied to social class (Thornton, 1995).
As subject, the self-identified lesbian fan undertakes her readings of popular culture from a position that carries with it certain subcultural lesbian knowledges, and these knowledges, or subcultural capital, affect the meanings that she will create from anime texts, or her process of decoding, to use Stuart Hall's term.
Scholars including Thornton, Angela McRobbie, and Barbara Bradby have critiqued the tendency of clubbing scholarship to focus on aspects of production (a level of participation that rends to be male dominated), and the frequency with which such scholarship privileges Birminghamesque narratives of subcultural capital and resistance that treat clubbers as unsexed, unraced, unmarked participants whose experiences are not affected by their identities.