subjunctive mood

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subjunctive mood

The subjunctive mood refers to verbs that are used to describe hypothetical or non-real actions, events, or situations. This is in comparison to the indicative mood, which is used to express factual, non-hypothetical information.
We most commonly use the subjunctive mood to express desires or wishes; to express commands, suggestions, requests, or statements of necessity; or to describe hypothetical outcomes that depend on certain conditions.
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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjunctive mood - a mood that represents an act or state (not as a fact but) as contingent or possible
modality, mood, mode - verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
Translations
konjunktiivisubjunktiivi
kötőmód
References in periodicals archive ?
In this context, communication and media scholars are well equipped to ask, as Schulz put it in his presentation at the 2014 International Communication Association conference in Seattle, "How can people live in the subjunctive mode?"
Which is why, less than four lines into his tale, Greenblatt switches to subjunctive mode: "As must have been immediately apparent ...
I want briefly to consider some of the dominant technical decisions and devices--specifically, the parenthesis, the subjunctive mode, and the apostrophe--that connect or distinguish these remarkable novels.
The subjunctive mode, by contrast, is not quite about us; it does not reveal its relevance all at once but yields it gradually through participation.
"Science Fiction Narratives of Mass Destruction and the Politics of National Security" (Davis) performs a literary analysis on Bush regime rhetoric as a form of "strategic fiction" written in a "subjunctive mode" (Samuel Delaney by way of Joanna Russ) that exceeds reality and fantasy and so can only be science fiction (152).
Clark has said of Cubism) producing a modernism in the subjunctive mode, to suggest what a primal painting might look like were the medium able to return to that point.
Indicative and subjunctive mode. Spanish for teachers: Applied linguistics, 174-195.