substellar


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substellar

(sʌbˈstɛlə)
adj
having a mass smaller than the mass needed by stars for nuclear fusion
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In May, a team of astronomers announced that they have discovered a small substellar "failure" called a brown dwarf that once had been a true star--before it was ravaged by its hungry white dwarf companion.
Adding to these substellar performance reports, a 2012 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (5) said that as much as one-third of U.
As part of this study, a new statistical method for computing the likelihood of a substellar distribution function was presented.
6 (hereafter J1407) seems to have a substellar companion with a gigantic ring system, inside which an "exomoon" might be forming--potentially the first detection of a satellite forming around an exoplanet.
Substellar and exoplanetary models are extremely complex and their production is an inherently multidisciplinary exercise in physics, chemistry and high-performance computing.
As a result, the hottest point on Kepler-76b isn't the substellar point ("high noon") but a location offset by about 10,000 miles.
That places this brown dwarf among the 10 nearest stellar or substellar systems, researchers report in an article posted online April 5 at arXiv.
2) Substellar objects with true masses above the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium are 'brown dwarfs', no matter how they formed or where they are located.
Several other confirmed substellar objects have been found recently.
If the person that has the stellar performance is going to be able to exercise that option, the person who's had substellar performance will probably also be able to exercise it because the market is just rocking that company along.
Andrews, Scotland, heads a project called Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters, and will use infrared data from JWST to study a stellar nursery - NGC 1333 in the constellation of Perseus - about 1,000 light-years away that is home to an unusually high number of brown dwarfs, some of which are not much heavier than Jupiter.
Brown dwarfs are "failed stars," relatively lightweight substellar objects that commonly are thought to be born like stars--within a dense, heavy blob of material embedded within a giant, cold, dark, molecular cloud that collapses under the weight of its own gravity to give birth to a fiery new baby star.